I am an Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, working in the Department of Physics.

My work is in high-energy astrophysics, studying black holes and active galactic nuclei with gamma-ray and X-ray telescopes.

We use X-ray and gamma-ray emission from cosmic sources to understand the most powerful particle accelerators in the Universe. We are also developing new instrumentation for the next generation of observatories.


Space instrumentation

We are developing X-ray optics and gamma-ray detectors for the next generation of high-energy astrophysics satellite missions.
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High-energy astrophysics

We use X-ray and gamma-ray observations to study cosmic particle accelerators such as relativistic jets and stellar-mass binaries.
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Data analysis & signal processing

We apply advanced data analysis algorithms to a variety of open questions in physics, astrophysics and beyond.
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Research News


VERITAS sees the awakening of a long-dormant blazar

The VERITAS Collaboration has issued an Astronomers Telegram to notify other observatories of the bright gamma-ray flux that VERITAS has measured from the blazar H 1426+428. Zach did part of the analysis that led to the announcement. This is a very interesting object with a relativistic jet that is capable of accelerating particles to extreme […]
Zach defends his PhD thesis!

Zach defends his PhD thesis!

Congratulations to Zach on the successful defense of his PhD thesis with title “Toward an understanding of high-mass gamma-ray binaries: an investigation using current observatories and the development of a future GeV instrument”!

VERITAS detects a new source of cosmic gamma rays

The VERITAS collaboration issued an Astronomers Telegram to report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray blazar. Our group participated in scheduling the observations and analyzing the VERITAS data, and Ella was in charge of the VERITAS data quality monitoring  while the observations were being taken.

William presents at the uSTAR research meeting

William presented the work he did this Summer simulating the response of Ge crystals for gamma-ray spectroscopy at the research meeting of the uSTAR Summer Scholars Program.