Tic Talk 2019 is a community event for patients, families and professionals interested in learning more about Tourette syndrome and tic disorders.

 

Monday, April 29, 2019

8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

at Eric P. Newman Education Center (EPNEC)
Washington University School of Medicine
320 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110

This is a half-day CME event sponsored by the Greater Missouri chapter of the Tourette Association of America and Washington University School of Medicine. Local and guest speakers will cover a variety of topics, including:

  • Current research on Tourette syndrome
  • Update on treatment of tics and other symptoms
  • Tics at school
  • Work & school accommodations
  • The latest on behavior therapy

Registration is free, but space is limited. CME fee is $85.

CME Continuing Education provided by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Continuing Medical Education. In support of improving patient care, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team. Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Questions? Contact bbeato@wustl.edu or 314-362-5041

Thanks to the Tourette Association of America and its Greater Missouri chapter for generously supporting this event.

It is the policy of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Continuing Medical Education, that planners, faculty and other persons who may influence content of this CME activity disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests in order for CME staff to identify and resolve any potential conflicts of interest prior to the educational activity.  Faculty must also disclose any planned discussion of unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices during their presentation.  Detailed disclosures will be made in activity handout materials.
Funding for this workshop is made possible in part by the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.