Contact

Alan Robert Templeton

Charles Rebstock Professor Emeritus of Biology
Department of Biology, Campus Box 1137
Professor Emeritus, Division of Statistical Genomics
Washington University
St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899, USA
Phone 314-935-6868; email temple_a@wustl.edu

Education

A.B. (Zoology) Washington University 1969
M.A. (Statistics) University of Michigan 1972
Ph.D. (Human Genetics) University of Michigan 1972

Professional Experience

1972-1974. Junior Fellow, Society of Fellows of the University of Michigan.

1974. Visiting Scholar, Department of Genetics, University of Hawaii.

1974-1977. Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of Texas at Austin.

1976. Visiting Assistant Professor, Dept. de Biologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

1977-1981. Associate Professor, Departments of Biology and Genetics, Washington University.

1981-present. Professor, Departments of Biology and Genetics, Washington University.

1983-1987. Genetics Study Section, NIH (also served as an ad hoc reviewer several times).

1984-1992: 1996-1997. Head, Evolutionary and Population Biology Program, Washington University.

1985. Visiting Professor, Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan.

1986. Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan.

1986-2013. Research Associate of the Missouri Botanical Garden.

1992. Elected Visiting Fellow, Merton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

2000. Visiting Professor, Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

2001-2013. Charles Rebstock Professor of Biology

2001-2013. Professor of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Washington University

2002-2013. Part-time Visiting Professor, Rappaport Institute, Medical School of the Technion, Israel.

2007. Fulbright-Israel Distinguished Chair in the Natural Sciences and Engineering, Israel.

2007-2010. Senior Research Associate, The Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Israel.

2009-2013.  Professor, Division of Statistical Genomics, Washington University

2010-2016.  Part-time Full Professor, Institute of Evolution, and Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, University of Haifa, Israel.

2013-present.  Professor Emeritus, Division of Statistical Genomics, Washington University

2013-present.  Charles Rebstock Professor Emeritus of Biology, Washington University

2016-2019.  Part-time Visiting Professor, Institute of Evolution, and Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, University of Haifa, Israel.

2018-present.  Biodiversity Fellow, Living Earth Collaborative, St. Louis, Missouri.

Research Interests

Population Genetics
Ecological Genetics
Speciation
Conservation Biology
Human Evolution
Molecular Quantitative Genetics and Transcriptomics of Common Diseases in Humans

Honors and Awards

Phi Eta Sigma, 1966.

Phi Beta Kappa, 1969.

Sigma Xi, Associate Member, l969; Full Member, l972.

Washington University Scholarship, l965-1969.

A.B. Summa Cum Laude, 1969.

NSF Predoctoral Fellowship, 1969-1972.

Junior Fellow, Society of Fellows of the University of Michigan, 1972-1974.

Edward Bean Award, 1984.  Awarded to the St. Louis Zoological Garden for Speke’s Gazelle Management Program designed by Templeton and Read.

Genetics Society of Australia Invited Oversea Speaker, 1988.

Edward Bean Award, 1989.  Awarded to the St. Louis Zoological Garden for the Banteng/Gaur Management Program designed by Templeton and Read.

Millercomm Distinguished Speaker, 1990.  University of Illinois.

NMSU Distinguished Speaker, 1991.  New Mexico State University.

EPSCoR Distinguished Speaker, 1992.  University of South Carolina.

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Distinguished Speaker, 1992.  Michigan State University.

Award “For Outstanding Effort in the Conservation of Missouri’s Biodiversity.”  Awarded jointly by the Missouri Department of Conservation and United States Forest Service, 1992.  Jefferson City, Missouri.

Ashby Dialogue Lecturer, 1994.  University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Russell Marker Lecturer, 1994.  Pennsylvania State University.

Rockefeller Distinguished Lecturer, 1994.  University of Arkansas.

President, Society for the Study of Evolution, 1996-1997.

George C. Wheeler Distinguished Lecturer, 1997.  University of North Dakota.

Elected Fellow of AAAS, 1997.  “For fundamental contributions to both experimental and theoretical population genetics and to conservation biology.”

Elected Fellow, Academy of Science of St. Louis, 1998.

Brode Lecturer, 2000.  Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Innovation Award in Functional Genomics, 2000.

Distinguished Israel Pollak Lecturer, 2000.  Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

Stigler Lecturer in Archaeology.  University of Arkansas, 2001.

Installed as Charles Rebstock Professor of Biology.  2001.

David Murdock-Dole Lectureship and Award “In recognition of outstanding contributions in human genetic studies.”  Nobelforum, Stockholm, Sweden. 2002.

Genetics Society of Australia Invited Oversea Speaker, 2004.

Lorene Murrow Kelly Distinguished Lecturer, University of Texas, 2005

Listed in the top 1% of cited authors for journals in the Life Sciences, 2005

Fulbright-Israel Distinguished Chair in the Natural Sciences and Engineering, 2007

Listed as an author of one of the top 1% most highly cited papers in the Life Sciences worldwide, 2011.

The 2011 Ecology paper on metapopulations in collared lizards was placed by the Faculty of 1000 in their library of the top 2% of published articles in biology and medicine.

Henning Andersen Prize For the Best Abstract (out of 1012) at the 2012 Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (one of nine coauthors).

Elected Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2012.

Listed as an author of one of the top 1% most highly cited papers in the Life Sciences worldwide, 2016.

Prime Member, Faculty of 1000, 2017 – present.

Mendeley Rankings of Citations Through 2019 (excluding self-citations) of the top 100,000 scientists in all fields:  2630 (top 2.6%) –  Ranking in Evolutionary Biology: 36 (top 0.03% of all publishing evolutionary biologists). 

Editorships

Associate Editor, “Theoretical Population Biology” 1978-1981.

Editor, “Theoretical Population Biology” 1981-1990.

Associate Editor, “The American Naturalist” 1980-1984, 2002­–2005.

Associate Editor, “Paleobiology” 1983-1985.

Editorial Board, “Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution” 1991–2010.

Associate Editor, “Brazilian Journal of Genetics” 1991–1997.

Associate Editor, “Genetics and Molecular Biology” 1998–2001.

Editorial Board, “Animal Conservation” 2004–2007.

Honorary Editorial Board Member, “Evolutionary Bioinformatics Online” 2005-present.

Editorial Board, “Rambam (Maimonides) Medical Journal” 2008-present.

Editor, Special Issue on “Cladistic Analysis and Molecular Evolution” for the “International Journal of Molecular Sciences” 2009-2010.

Associate Editor, “Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution” 2010-present.

Executive Committee Member, “The Common Reader:  A Journal of the Essay” 2013-present.

Offices and Memberships

American Association for the Advancement of Science 1995 – present.

Society for the Study of Evolution 1974 – 2010.

Vice President I, 1982-1983; President, 1996-1997.

Genetics Society of America 1974 – present.

Member of the Education Committee of the GSA, 1986-1988.

Consultant, St. Louis Zoological Garden, 1979–present.

Consultant, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C., 1983-1989.

Consultant, Ecumenical Dioxin Task Force, 1984-1987.

Genetics Study Section, NIH, Permanent member1983-1987, plus occasional ad hoc attendance.

Founding member of the Society for Conservation Biology. 1985 – present.

Member, Board of Directors of SCB, 1985-1988.

Trustee, the Missouri Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, 1988 – 2019.

Vice President for Conservation, 1996–2000.

Member, Biodiversity Task Force for the State of Missouri, 1990–1992.

Member, International Evaluation Panel of Swedish Research in Systematics. Swedish Natural Science Research Council, 1990.

Member, UNESCO-MAB/IUBS/SCOPE Workshop on a Research Agenda for Biodiversity, 1991-1994.

Consultant, Ralston Purina Company, Pet Nutrition Research Department, 1989–1992.

Consultant, Genetics Research Panel for the Biosphere 2 Project, 1991.

Member, Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee, Department of Energy, 1993.

National Institutes of General Medical Sciences Council, ad hoc member.  1993.

Member, Advisory Committee, Tropical Terrestrial Ecology Division of the Minority Research Center for Excellence. 1994–1998.

Member, Genetic Biodiversity Maintenance Working Group for the State of Missouri. 1994–1996.

Gene Scene Redesign Advisory Team, St. Louis Science Center.  1994-1996.

Member, National Research Council Panel on Evolutionary Implications of Modern Species Extinction.  1995-1996.

Member, National Research Council Committee on “The Human Genome Diversity Project.” 1996-1997.

Member, Natural Systems Agriculture Advisory Team, The Land Institute, Salina, KS, 1997–2013.

Member, Advisory Committee, Columbia Earth Institute, Columbia University, NY, 1997.

Consultant, Variagenics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts.  1997–2003.

Member, Advisory Board, RGA/Washington University Longevity Research Foundation, 1998–1999.

Chair of the NIH Advisory Group for a Proposed Initiative on Studies of Large-scale genetic variation, 2001.

American Society of Naturalists, 2002-2005.

Zoological Society of London, 2004­–2007.

External Evaluator, Departments of Biology at the Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo Campus and Riberão Preto Campus, 2004.

Member of the Monitoring and Assessment Panel for the “Investing in Multidisciplinary University Activities (IMUA II) through NSF Hawaii EPSCoR RII.”  2006-2009.

Member, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Team for the Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana).  2006–present.

Member of the Monitoring and Assessment Panel for the “Investing in Multidisciplinary University Activities (IMUA III) through NSF Hawaii EPSCoR RII.”  2010-2014.

Research Support

NSF Grant GB-41278.  “The Unit of Selection.”  Co-principal investigator with Dr. C. Sing.  $20,000, 1974.

NIH Grant GM-20903.  “The Unit of Selection.”  Co-principal investigator with Dr. C. Sing.  $50,000, 1974-1977.

NSF Grant BMS74-17453.  “The Evolutionary Biology of Drosophila mercatorum.”  $40,000, 1974-1977.

Biomedical Sciences Support Grant.  $5,000, 1974-1975.

NSF Grant DEB76-16985.  “Studies of Selection, Fitness and Speciation.”  $51,000, 1976-1979.

NSF Grant DEB78-10455. “Selection, Fitness and Speciation.”  $33,340, 1978–1979.

NSF Grant DEB79-08860. “Selection, Coadaptation and Speciation in Drosophila mercatorum.”  $51,652, 1979-1980.

NIH Grant R01 GM27021. “Selection, Coadapation and Speciation in Drosophila mercatorum.” $136,027, 1980-1983.

Biomedical Research Support Grant.  $4,600, 1981-1982.

Biomedical Research Support Grant.  $4,000, 1983-1984.

NIH Grant 1 P41 GM32675-01.  “VAX11/750 Computational Facility.”  $120,000, 1984.

Biomedical Research Support Grant.  $2,500, 1984-1985.

Missouri Conversation Commission Contract for Establishing Collared Lizard Populations on Restored Glades.  $2,350, 1984.

Biomedical Research Support Grant.  $6,600, 1985-1986.

Subcontract to “Genetic assessment of the captive breeding plan and the breeding population in the Mexican wolf (Canis lupis baileyi ) recovery program.  $5,000, 1985.

Nixon Griffis Fund for Zoological Research.  “Genetic survey of wild cattle, oxen and buffalo.” $3,000, 1986-1987.

Biomedical Research Support Grant.  $5,000, 1986-1987.

NIH Grant R01 AGO2246.  “The Aging Effects Associated with a Polygenic Complex.”  $122,654, 1980-1983. $159,404, 1983-1986. $132,423, 1986-1989.   $199,239, 1989-1992.

NSF Grant BSR-9007117.  “The evolutionary genetics of a mate recognition cue:  male song in Hawaiian crickets.”  $134,616 direct costs, 1990-1993.

NIH Grant S10 RR06380-01.  VAX computer system for the Biology Department. $132,130, 1991-1992.

NSF Grant BSR 9112000.  An examination of the speciation process in Orconectes, subgenus Procericambarus.  Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Keith Crandall.  $10,041, 1991-1993.

NSF Grant BSR 9112619.  Population subdivision in Trimerotropis saxatilis (Acrididae). Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Anne Gerber.  $10,050, 1991-1993.

NSF Grant DEB 9213184.  An analysis of the speciation process in cave spiders of the genus Nesticus.  Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Marshal Hedin.  $10,007, 1992-1994.

Subcontract to Dr. Charles F. Sing’s NIH grant R01 HL39107, “Genetic epidemiology of coronary heart disease.”  $90,000 (subcontract only), 1987-92.   $166,446, 1992-1997.

NIH Grant R01 GM31571.  “The Use of Recombinant DNA in Population Genetics.” $330,795, 1983-1986. $635,708, 1986-1991. $615,876, 1991-1997.

NSF Grant DEB 9423684.  A phylogenetic assessment of biogeography and character evolution in the subfamily Antelopinae.  Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Laura Bischof.  $10,000, 1995-1999.

NSF Grant DEB-9701809.  Separating population structure from population history in the South American cactophilic Drosophila buzzatii subgroup.  Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Reinaldo Alves de Brito.  $13,350. 1997-1999.

NSF Grant DEB-9610219.  The impact of forest fire management on the population structure of collared lizards in the Ozarks.  $227,000, 1997-2001.  $389,999, 2001-2008. REU supplements, $5,000 1998. $5,000 1999; $6000 2002; $6000 2003.  ROA supplement, $25,000, 2003.

NIH Grant R01 GM60730.  Co-PI with Dr. Richard Markham, Johns Hopkins University.  The impact of recombination in HIV-1 on intrahost evolution.  $392,286 (W.U. portion only).  1999-2004.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund Innovation Award in Functional Genomics.  Cladistic analysis of epistasis among candidate genes influencing common diseases.  $200,000.  2000-2004.

NSF Grant DEB-0104977.  The evolution and development of abdominal pigmentation patterns in natural populations of Drosophila polymorpha.  Doctoral dissertation improvement grant for Jennifer Brisson.  $10,000.  2001-2003.

NIH R01 HG002191.  Race and public communication about human variation.  $64,380 (W.U. subcontract only).  2001-2004.

NIH 1U01 GM63340 (Dr. Howard McLeod, PI).  Functional polymorphism analysis in drug pathways.  $40,000 (My subcontract only).  2001-2005.   $80,000 2005-2010.

Packard Foundation Interdisciplinary Science Program.  A multidisciplinary approach to the study of the evolution of biological form and diversity.  $1,000,000 (shared among five co-pi’s).  2001-2006.

NIH P50-GM65509 (Dr. Charles F. Sing, PI).  Genomic approaches to common chronic disease. $270,975 (W.U. subcontract only).  2004-2007.   $900,000 (W.U. subcontract only). 2007-2013.

NIH 2RO1 GM02871924A2 (Dr. D. C. Rao, PI).  Research project in genetic epidemiology. $85,000 (My subcontract only).  2005-2009.

Legacy Heritage Fund Limited.  Convergence of Population Genetics and Computational Technologies in the Identification of Genomic Susceptibility Loci and in Predictive Genomics in Populations with Well Defined Genetic Architecture.  $100,000.  2008.

NSF DDIG 0807879 (Templeton and Griffin, coPIs). Dissertation Research: Impacts of invasive species: population consequences of altering inbreeding depression and mating systems in native plants. $11,870.  2008-2010.

BSF 2009296.  Co-PI with Dr. Shirli Bar-David, Ben Gurion University, Israel.  Interaction between range expansion and genetic structure in a reintroduced wild ass population.  $60,000.  2010-2012.

BSF 2011384.  Co-PI with Drs. Shirli Bar-David and Amos Bouskila, Ben Gurion University, Israel.  The interactions of behavioral patterns with landscape in influencing population structure.  $144,000.  2012-2016.

DIP BL-1271/1/1.  Co-PI with Dr. Leon Blaustein, University of Haifa, Sebastian Steinfartz, University of Bielefeld, and Arne Nolte, Max-Planck Institute.  Ecological genomics: analysis of gene expression underlying parallel habitat adaptation in distinct salamander species. €1,636,095.  2013-2018.

Templeton Foundation.  Consultant with Drs. Adi Livnat, University of Haifa, and Karl Skorecki, Ben Gurion Medical School, Sfat, Israel. Directionality in the origination of mutation: Empirical tests of whether mutation in the human genome is non-random yet not Lamarckian.  $920,000.  2019-2021.

NIH 3RF1AG053303-01S2. Consultant with P.I ‘s Dr. Sharlee Climer, University of Missouri at St. Louis; Dr. Carlos Cruchaga, Washington University School of Medicine, and Dr. Daniel Jacobson, Oakridge National Laboratory. A multipronged interrogation of large-scale omics data to reveal COVID-19 pathways. $650,002. 2020-2021.

NSF-BSF 3016111.  Co-PI with Drs. Shirli Bar-David and Amos Bouskila, Ben Gurion University, Israel, and Dr. Daniel Rubenstein, Princeton University, NJ.  Unraveling the causes and consequences of recursive movement in the Asiatic wild ass.  $229,988.  2020-2023.

Publications

THESES

Bachelor’s:  The Population Genetics of Scaptomyza pallida.
Doctorate:  Statistical Models of Parthenogenesis.

BOOKS

  1. Templeton, A. R.   2006.  Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory.  John Wiley & Sons.  705 pgs.  Portuguese Edition 2011, translated by Reinaldo Alves de Brito.  Genetica de Populaçoes e Teoria Micoevolutiva.
  2. Templeton, A. R.  2018.  Human Population Genetics and Genomics.  Academic Press/Elsevier, Oxford.  498 pgs.
  3. Templeton, A. R.  2021.  Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory, 2nd Edition. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford.  768 pgs.

ARTICLES IN PEER REVIEWED JOURNALS

  1. Templeton, A.R. and E.D. Rothman.  The population genetics of parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum. I.  One locus models and statistics.  Theoretical and Applied Genetics  43: 204-212, 1973.
  2. Templeton, A.R.  Density dependent selection in parthenogenetic and self-mating populations.  Theoretical Population Biology 5: 229-250, 1974.
  3. Templeton, A.R. and E.D. Rothman.  Evolution in heterogeneous environments.  American Naturalist 108: 409-428, 1974.
  4. Templeton, A.R.  Analysis of selection in populations observed over a sequence of consecutive generations.  I. Some one locus models with a single, constant fitness component per genotype.  Theoretical and Applied Genetics 45: 179-191, 1974.
  5. Rothman, E.D., C.F. Sing and A.R. Templeton.  A model for analysis of population structure.  Genetics 78: 943-960, 1974.
  6. Templeton, A.R., C.F. Sing and B. Brokaw.  The unit of selection in Drosophila mercatorum. I. The interaction of selection and meiosis in parthenogenetic strains.   Genetics 82: 349-376, 1976.
  7. Templeton, A.R., H.L. Carson and C.F. Sing.  The population genetics of parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum.  II.  The capacity for parthenogenesis in a natural, bisexual population.  Genetics 82: 527-542, 1976.
  8. Carson, H.L., L.T. Teramoto and A.R. Templeton.  Behavioral differences between isogenic strains of Drosophila mercatorum.  Behavior Genetics 7: 189-197, 1977.
  9. Templeton, A.R.  Analysis of head shape differences between two interfertile species of Hawaiian Drosophila.  Evolution 31: 630-642, 1977.
  10. Templeton, A.R.  Survival probabilities of mutant alleles in fine grained environments.  American Naturalist 111: 897-902, 1977.
  11. Annest, J.L. and A.R. Templeton.  Genetic recombination and clonal selection in Drosophila mercatorum. Genetics 89: 193-210, 1978.
  12. Templeton, A.R. and E.D. Rothman.  Evolution in fine-grained environments.  I.  Environmental runs and the evolution of homeostasis.  Theoretical Population Biology 13: 340-355, 1978.
  13. Templeton, A.R. and D.A. Levin.  Evolutionary consequences of seed pools.  American Naturalist 114: 232-249, 1979.
  14. Templeton, A.R.  Chromosome number, quantitative genetics and eusociality.  American Naturalist 113: 937-941, 1979.
  15. Templeton, A.R.  A frequency-dependent model of brood selection.  American Naturalist 114: 515-524, 1979.
  16. Templeton, A.R.  Once again, why 300 species of Hawaiian Drosophila ?  Evolution 33: 513-517, 1979.
  17. Templeton, A.R.  The unit of selection in Drosophila mercatorum. II.  Genetic revolutions and the origin of coadapted genomes in parthenogenetic strains.  Genetics 92: 1265-1282, 1979.
  18. Templeton, A.R.  The parthenogenetic capacities and genetic structures of sympatric populations of Drosophila mercatorum  and Drosophila hydei.  Genetics 92: 1283-1293, 1979.
  19. 19,  Templeton, A.R.  The theory of speciation via the founder principle.  Genetics 94: 1011-1038, 1980.
  20. Yokoyama, S. and A.R. Templeton.  The effect of social selection on the population dynamics of Huntington’s disease.  Annals of Human Genetics 43: 413-417, 1980.
  21. Templeton, A.R. and S. Yokoyama.  The effect of reproductive compensation and the desire to have male offspring on the incidence of a sex-linked lethal disease.  American Journal of Human Genetics 32: 575-581, 1980.
  22. Ochman, H., B. Stille, M. Niklasson, R.K. Selander and A.R. Templeton.  Evolution of clonal diversity in the parthenogenetic fly Lonchoptera dubia.  Evolution 34: 539-547, 1980.
  23. Templeton, A.R.  Modes of speciation and inferences based on genetic distances.  Evolution 34: 719-729, 1980.
  24. Rothman, E.D. and A.R. Templeton.  A class of models of selectively neutral alleles.  Theoretical Population Biology 18: 135-150, 1980.
  25. Templeton, A.R.  The evolution of life histories under pleiotropic constraints and r-selection.  Theoretical Population Biology 18: 279-289, 1980.
  26. Templeton, A.R. and L.R. Lawlor.  The fallacy of the averages in ecological optimization theory.  American Naturalist 117: 390-393, 1981.
  27. Templeton, A.R.  Some comments on “Genetic variation and progressive evolution” by D. Layzer.  American Naturalist 117: 1049-1051, 1981.
  28. Templeton, A.R. and E.D. Rothman.  Evolution in fine-grained environments.  II.  Habitat selection as a homeostatic mechanism.  Theoretical Population Biology 19: 326-340, 1981.
  29. Templeton, A.R.  Mechanisms of speciation — a population genetic approach.  Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 12: 32-48, 1981.
  30. Clark, R.L., A.R. Templeton and C.F. Sing.  Studies of enzyme polymorphisms in the Kamuela population of D. mercatorum.  I.  Estimation of the level of polymorphism.  Genetics 98: 597-611, 1981.
  31. Templeton, A.R., R. DeSalle and V. Walbot.  Speciation and inferences on rates of molecular evolution from genetic distances.  Heredity 47: 439-442, 1981.
  32. Yokoyama, S. and A.R. Templeton.  Effect of cultural inheritance of reproductive compensation on the incidence of a sex-linked lethal disease.  Journal of Theoretical Biology 99: 389-395, 1982.
  33. Templeton, A.R.  The crisis of partial extinction.  Natural Areas Journal 2, No. 3: 35-38, 1982.
  34. Templeton, A.R.  Phylogenetic inference from restriction endonuclease cleavage site maps with particular reference to the evolution of humans and the apes.  Evolution 37: 221-244, 1983.
  35. Giddings, L.V. and A.R. Templeton.  Behavioral phylogenies and the direction of evolution.  Science 220: 372-378, 1983.
  36. Templeton, A.R.  Systematics of Basidiomycetes based on 5S rRNA sequences and other data.  Nature 303: 731-732, 1983.
  37. Perondini, A.L.P., P.A. Otto, A.R. Templeton and A. Rogatko.  Evidence for assortative mating systems related to the polytene chromosome-band polymorphism in Sciara ocellaris.  Journal of Heredity 74:283-288, 1983.
  38. Templeton, A.R. and B. Read.  Factors eliminating inbreeding depression in a captive herd of Speke’s gazelle.  Zoo Biology 3: 177-199, 1984.
  39. Carson, H.L. and A.R. Templeton.  Genetic revolutions in relation to speciation phenomena:  the founding of new populations.  Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 15: 97-131, 1984.
  40. Templeton, A.R.  The phylogeny of the hominoid primates:  a statistical analysis of the DNA-DNA hybridization data. Molecular Biology and Evolution 2: 420-433, 1985.
  41. Templeton, A.R., T.J. Crease and F. Shah.  The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila mercatorum.  I.  Basic genetics.  Genetics 111: 805-818, 1985.
  42. DeSalle, R., L.V. Giddings and A.R. Templeton.  Mitochondrial DNA variability in natural populations of Hawaiian Drosophila. I. Methods and levels of variability in D. silvestris  and D. heteroneura  populations.  Heredity 56: 75-86, 1986.
  43. DeSalle, R. and A.R. Templeton.  The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen. III. Tissue-specific differential replication of ribosomal genes modulates the abnormal abdomen phenotype in Drosophila mercatorum.  Genetics 112: 877-886, 1986.
  44. Templeton, A.R.  Further comments on the statistical analysis of DNA-DNA hybridization data.  Molecular Biology and Evolution 3: 290-295, 1986.
  45. Templeton, A.R., H. Hemmer, G. Mace, U.S. Seal, W.M. Shields, and D.S. Woodruff.  Local adaptation, coadaptation, and population boundaries.  Zoo Biol. 5: 115-125, 1986.
  46. DeSalle, R. and A.R. Templeton.  Comments on “The significance of asymmetrical sexual isolation.”  Evolution Biol. 21:  21-27, 1987.
  47. Templeton, A.R.  The general relationship between average effect and average excess.  Genetic Research 49: 69-70, 1987.
  48. Templeton, A.R.  Nonparametric phylogenetic inference from restriction cleavage sites.  Molecular Biology and Evolution 4: 315-319, 1987.
  49. DeSalle, R., A.R. Templeton, I. Mori, S. Pletscher, and J.S. Johnston.  Temporal and spatial heterogeneity of mtDNA polymorphisms in natural populations of Drosophila mercatorum.  Genetics 116: 215-223, 1987.
  50. Templeton, A.R., E. Boerwinkle, and C.F. Sing.  A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping. I. Basic theory and an analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Drosophila.  Genetics 117: 343-351, 1987.
  51. Templeton, A.R., S.K. Davis, and B. Read.  Genetic variability in a captive herd of Speke’s gazelle (Gazella spekei ).  Zoo Biology 6: 305-313, 1987.
  52. Ralls, K., J.D. Ballou, and A.R. Templeton.  Estimates of lethal equivalents and the cost of inbreeding in mammals.  Conservation Biology 2: 185-193, 1988.
  53. DeSalle, R., and A.R. Templeton.  Founder effects and the rate of mitochondrial DNA evolution in Hawaiian Drosophila.  Evolution 42: 1076-1084, 1988.
  54. Georgiadis, N., P. Dunham, B. Read, and A. R. Templeton.  HK/LK polymorphism and its genetic determination in Speke’s gazelle.  Journal of Heredity 79: 325-331, 1988.
  55. Templeton, A.R., C.F. Sing, A. Kessling, and S. Humphries.  A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping.  II.  The analysis of natural populations.  Genetics 120: 1145-1154, 1988.
  56. Ahearn, J.N. and A.R. Templeton.  Interspecific hybrids of Drosophila heteroneura  and D. silvestris. I. Courtship success.  Evolution 43: 347-361, 1989.
  57. Templeton, A.R., H. Hollocher, S. Lawler, and J.S. Johnston.  Natural selection and ribosomal DNA in Drosophila.  Genome 31: 296-303, 1989.
  58. Templeton, A.R., K. Shaw, E. Routman, and S.K. Davis.  The genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation.  Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 77: 13-27, 1990.
  59. Davis, S.K., J.E. Strassmann, C. Hughes, L.S. Pletscher and A.R. Templeton.  Population structure and kinship in Polistes  (Hymenoptera, Vespidae): an analysis using ribosomal DNA and protein electrophoresis.  Evolution 44: 1242-1253, 1990.
  60. Templeton, A.R.  The role of genetics in captive breeding and reintroduction for species conservation.  Endangered Species UPDATE 8: 14-17, 1990.
  61. Hollocher, H., A.R. Templeton, R. DeSalle, and J.S. Johnston.  The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen.  IV.  Components of genetic variation in a natural population of Drosophila mercatorum.  Genetics 130: 355-366, 1992.
  62. Templeton, A.R.  Human origins and analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.  Science 255: 737, 1992.
  63. Sing, C.F., M.B. Haviland, K.E. Zerba and A.R. Templeton.  Application of cladistics to the analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.  European Journal of Epidemiology 8 (Suppl. 1): 3-9, 1992.
  64. DeSalle, R. and A.R. Templeton.  The mtDNA genealogy of closely related Drosophila silvestris.  Journal of Heredity 83: 211-216, 1992.
  65. Templeton, A.R., K.A. Crandall, and C.F. Sing.  A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequence data.  III.  Cladogram estimation. Genetics 132: 619-633, 1992.
  66. Sing, C.F., M.B. Haviland, A.R. Templeton, K.E. Zerba, and S.L. Reilly.   Biological complexity and strategies for finding DNA variations responsible for inter-individual variation in risk of a common chronic disease, coronary artery disease. Annals of Medicine 24: 539-547, 1992.
  67. Templeton, A.R.  The “Eve” hypothesis:  A genetic critique and reanalysis.  American Anthropologist 95: 51-72, 1993.
  68. Templeton, A. R., H. Hollocher and J. S. Johnston. The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomenin Drosophila mercatorum.  V.  Female phenotypic expression on natural genetic backgrounds and in natural environments. Genetics 134: 475-485, 1993.
  69. Templeton, A. R. and C. F. Sing. A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping.  IV.  Nested analyses with cladogram uncertainty and recombination. Genetics 134: 659-669. 1993.
  70. Crandall, K. A. and A. R. Templeton. Empirical tests of some predictions from coalescent theory with applications to intraspecific phylogeny reconstruction. Genetics 134: 959-969, 1993.
  71. Lawler, D. F., A. R. Templeton and K. L. Monti. Evidence for genetic involvement in feline dilated cardiomyopathy. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 7: 383-387, 1993.
  72. Hollocher, Hope and A.R. Templeton.  The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila mercatorum.  VI.  The non-neutrality of the Y chromosome rDNA polymorphism. Genetics 136: 1373-1384, 1994.
  73. Georgiadis, N., L. Bischof, A. Templeton, J. Patton, W. Karesh, and D. Western.  Structure and history of African elephant populations:  I.  Eastern and Southern Africa.  Journal of Heredity 85: 100-104, 1994.
  74. Templeton, A.R.  “Eve”:  hypothesis compatibility versus hypothesis testing.  American Anthropologist 96: 141-147, 1994.
  75. Castelloe, J. and A.R. Templeton.   Root probabilities for intraspecific gene trees under neutral coalescent theory.  Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 3: 102-113, 1994.
  76. Templeton, A. R.  Biodiversity at the molecular genetic level:  experiences from disparate macroorganisms. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 345: 59-64, 1994.
  77. Carson, H. L., F. C. Val and A. R. Templeton.  Change in male secondary sexual characters in artificial interspecific hybrid populations.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 91: 6315-6318, 1994.
  78. Butler, M., A. R. Templeton and B. Read.  DNA fingerprinting in Speke’s gazelle:  a test for genetic distinctness, and the correlation between relatedness and similarity.  Molecular Ecology 3: 355-361, 1994.
  79. Routman, E., R. Wu and A. R. Templeton.  Parsimony, molecular evolution, and biogeography:  the case of the North American giant salamander.  Evolution 48: 1799-1809, 1994.
  80. Lawler, D. F., A. R. Templeton and K. L. Monti.  Feline dilated cardiomyopathy:  genetic aspects.  Veterinary Clinical Nutrition 1(4): 159-162, 1995.
  81. Templeton, A. R.  A cladistic analysis of phenotypic associations with haplotypes inferred from restriction endonuclease mapping or DNA sequencing.  V.  Analysis of case/control sampling designs:  Alzheimer’s disease and the Apoprotein E locus.  Genetics 140: 403-409, 1995.
  82. McNearney, T., Z. Hornickova, A. R. Templeton, A. Birdwell, M. Arens, R. Markham, A. Saah and L. Ratner.  Nef and LTR sequence variation from sequentially derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.  Virology 208: 388-398, 1995.
  83. Templeton, A. R., E. Routman and C. Phillips.  Separating population structure from population history:  a cladistic analysis of the geographical distribution of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum.  Genetics 140: 767-782, 1995.
  84. Gerber, A. S. and A. R. Templeton.  Population sizes and within-deme movement of Trimerotropsis saxatilis(Acrididae), a grasshopper with a  fragmented distribution.  Oecologica 105: 343-350, 1996.
  85. Markham, R. B., D. H. Schwartz, A. Templeton, J. B. Margolick, H. Farzadegan, D. Vlahov and X. Yu.  Selective transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants to SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.  Journal of Virology 70: 6947-6954, 1996.
  86. Templeton, A. R.  Experimental evidence for the genetic-transilience model of speciation.  Evolution 50: 909-915, 1996.
  87. Templeton, A. R.  Gene lineages and human evolution.  Science 272: 1363, 1996.
  88. Ratner, L., T. Joseph, J. Bandres, S. Ghosh, N. V. Heyden, A. Templeton, B. Hahn, W. Powderly and M. Arens.  Sequence heterogeneity of Nef transcripts in HIV-1 infected subjects at different stages of disease.  Virology 223: 245-250, 1996.
  89. Templeton, A. R.  Contingency tests of neutrality using intra/interspecific gene trees:  the rejection of neutrality for the evolution of the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase II gene in the hominoid primates.  Genetics 144: 1263-1270, 1996.
  90. Templeton, A. R.  Out of Africa?  What do genes tell us? Current Opinion in Genetics & Development 7: 841-847, 1997.
  91. Templeton, A. R. and B. Read.  Elimination of inbreeding depression from a captive population of Speke’s gazelle:  Validity of the original statistical analysis and confirmation by permutation testing.  Zoo Biol. 17: 77-94, 1998.
  92. Templeton, A. R.  Nested clade analyses of phylogeographic data:  testing hypotheses about gene flow and population history.  Molecular Ecology 7: 381-397, 1998.
  93. Hammer, M. F., T. Karafet, A. Rasanayagam, E. T. Wood, T. K. Altheide, T. Jenkins, R. C. Griffiths, A. R. Templeton and S. L. Zegura.  Out of Africa and back again: Nested cladistic analysis of human Y chromosome variation.  Molecular Biology and Evolution 15: 427-441, 1998.
  94. Templeton, A. R.  Human Races:  A Genetic and Evolutionary Perspective.  American Anthropologist 100(3): 632-650, 1998.
  95. Markham, R. B., W. Wang, A. E. Weisstein, Z. Wang, A. Munoz, A. R. Templeton, J. Margolick, D. Vlahov, T. Quinn, H. Farzadegan and X. Yu.  Patterns of HIV-1 evolution in individuals with differing rates of CD4 T cell decline. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 95: 12568-12573, 1998.
  96. Templeton, A. R.  The Complexity of The Genotype-Phenotype Relationship and the Limitations of Using Genetic “Markers” at the Individual Level.  Science in Context 11(3/4): 373-389, 1998.
  97. Crandall, K. A. and A. R. Templeton.  The zoogeography and centers of origin of the crayfish subgenusProcericambarus (Decapoda : Cambaridae).  Evolution 53: 123-134, 1999.
  98. Karafet, T. M., S. L. Zegura, O. Posukh, L. Osipova, A. Bergen, J. Long, D. Goldman, W. Klitz, S. Harihara, P. de Knijff, V. Wiebe, R. C. Griffiths, A. R. Templeton and M. F. Hammer.  Ancestral Asian source(s) of New World Y-chromosome founder haplotypes.  American Journal of Human Genetics 64(3): 817-831, 1999.
  99. Templeton, A. R.  Uses of evolutionary theory in the human genome project.  Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 30: 23-49, 1999.
  100. Matioli, S. R. and A. R. Templeton. Coadapted gene complexes for morphological traits in Drosophila mercatorum. Two-loci interactions.  Heredity 83: 54-61, 1999.
  101. Templeton, A. R. Experimental Tests of Genetic Transilience. Evolution 53: 1628-1632, 1999.
  102. Durand, J. D., A. R. Templeton, B. Guinand, A. Imsiridou and Y. Bouvet. Nested clade and phylogeographic analyses of the chub, Leuciscus cephalus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) in Greece: implications for Balkan Peninsula biogeography. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 13: 566-580, 1999.
  103. Hutchison, D. W. and A. R. Templeton. Correlation of pairwise genetic and geographic distance measures: inferring the relative influences of gene flow and drift on the distribution of genetic variability.  Evolution 53: 1898-1914, 1999.
  104. Carneiro, M., X. F. Yu, C. Lyles, A. Templeton, A. E. Weisstein, M. Safaeian, H. Farzadegan, D. Vlahov, and R. B. Markham. The effect of drug-injection behavior on genetic evolution of HIV-1. Journal of Infectious Diseases 180:1025-1032, 1999.
  105. Templeton, A. R., A. G. Clark, K. M. Weiss, D. A. Nickerson, J. Stengård, E. Boerwinkle and C. F. Sing. Recombinational and mutational hotspots within the human Lipoprotein Lipase gene. American Journal of Human Genetics 66: 69-83, 2000.
  106. Posada, D., K. A. Crandall, and A. R. Templeton. GeoDis: a program for the cladistic nested analysis of the geographical distribution of genetic haplotypes. Molecular Ecology 9:487-488, 2000.
  107. Phillips, C. A., G. Suau and A. R. Templeton. Effects of Holocene climate fluctuation on mitochondrial DNA variation in the ringed salamander, Ambystoma annulatum. Copeia 2000: 542-545, 2000.
  108. Dominique Durand, J., E. Ünlü, I. Doadrio, S. Pipoyan and A. R. Templeton. Origin, radiation, dispersion and allopatric hybridization in the chub Leuciscus cephalus. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 267: 1687-1697, 2000.
  109. Templeton, A. R., A. G. Clark, K. M. Weiss, D. A. Nickerson, E. Boerwinkle and C. F. Sing. Cladistic structure within the human Lipoprotein Lipase gene and its implications for phenotypic association studies. Genetics 156: 1259-1275, 2000.
  110. Cruzan, M. B. and A. R. Templeton. Paleoecology and coalescence: phylogeographic analysis of hypotheses from the fossil record. Trends in Evolution and Ecology 15(12): 491-496, 2000.
  111. Templeton, A. R., S. D. Maskas and M. B. Cruzan. Gene Trees: A Powerful Tool for Exploring the Evolutionary Biology of Species and Speciation. Plant Species Biology 15(3): 211-222, 2000.
  112. Templeton, A. R. Using phylogeographic analyses of gene trees to test species status and processes. Molecular Ecology 10:779-791, 2001.
  113. Templeton, A. R., R. J. Robertson, J. Brisson and J. Strasburg. Disrupting evolutionary processes: The effect of habitat fragmentation on collared lizards in the Missouri Ozarks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 98(10): 5426-5432, 2001.
  114. Kramer, M. G., and A. R. Templeton. Life-history changes that accompany the transition from sexual to parthenogenetic reproduction in Drosophila mercatorum. Evolution 55:748-761, 2001.
  115. Templeton, A. R. Out of Africa again and again. Nature 416: 45 – 51, 2002.
  116. Antunes, A., A. R. Templeton, R. Guyomard, and P. Alexandrino. Correction: The role of nuclear genes in intraspecitic evolutionary inference: Genealogy of the transferrin gene in the brown trout (vol 19, pg 1272, 2002). Molecular Biology and Evolution 19:1644, 2002.
  117. Branco, M., M. Monnerot, N. Ferrand and A.R. Templeton. Postglacial dispersal of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on the Iberian peninsula reconstructed from nested clade and mismatch analyses of mitochondrial DNA genetic variation. Evolution 56: 792–803, 2002.
  118. Kramer, M.G., A.R. Templeton and K.G. Miller. Evolutionary implications of developmental instability in parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum. I. Comparison of several strains with different genotypes. Evolution & Development 4: 223-233, 2002.
  119. Kramer, M.G., A.R. Templeton and K.G. Miller. Evolutionary implications of developmental instability in parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum. II. Comparison of two strains with identical genotypes, but different modes of reproduction. Evolution & Development 4: 234-241, 2002.
  120. Templeton, A.R. “Optimal” randomization strategies when testing the existence of a phylogeographic structure: A reply to Petit and Grivet. Genetics 161: 473-475, 2002.
  121. Antunes, A., A.R. Templeton, R. Guyomard and P. Alexandrino. The role of nuclear genes in intraspecific evolutionary inference: genealogy of the transferrin gene in the brown trout. Molecular Biology and Evolution 19(8): 1272-1287, 2002.
  122. Templeton, A.R. The Speke’s Gazelle Breeding Program as an Illustration of the Importance of Multilocus Genetic Diversity in Conservation Biology: Response to Kalinowski et al. Conservation Biology 16: 1151-1155, 2002.
  123. Williams, S. M., and A. R. Templeton. Race and Genomics. New England Journal of Medicine June 348:2581-2582, 2003.
  124. Bates, B. R., A. Templeton, P. J. Achter, T. M. Harris, and C. M. Condit. What does a gene for heart disease mean? A focus group study of public understandings of genetic risk factors. American Journal of Medical Genetics 119A:156-161, 2003.
  125. Brisson, J. A., J. L. Strasburg, and A. R. Templeton. Impact of fire management on the ecology of collared lizard (Crotaphytus collaris) populations living on the Ozark Plateau. Animal Conservation 6:247-254, 2003.
  126. Condit, C., A. R. Templeton, B. R. Bates, J. L. Bevan, and T. M. Harris. Attitudinal barriers to delivery of race-targeted pharmacogenomics among informed lay persons. Genetics in Medicine 5:385-392, 2003.
  127. Templeton, A. R. Statistical phylogeography: methods of evaluating and minimizing inference errors. Molecular Ecology 13:789-809,2004.
  128. Templeton, A. R. Using Haplotype Trees for Phylogeographic and Species Inference in Fish Populations. Environmental Biology of Fishes 69:7-20, 2004.
  129. Templeton, A. R., R. A. Reichert, A. E. Weisstein, X. F. Yu, and R. B. Markham. Selection in context: patterns of natural selection in the glycoprotein 120 region of human immunodeficiency virus 1 within infected individuals. Genetics 167:1547-1561, 2004.
  130. Brisson, J. A., A. R. Templeton, and I. Duncan. Population Genetics of the Developmental Gene optomotor-blind (omb) in Drosophila polymorpha: Evidence for a Role in Abdominal Pigmentation Variation. Genetics 168:1999-2010, 2004.
  131. Templeton, A. R., T. Maxwell, D. Posada, J. H. Stengard, E. Boerwinkle, and C. F. Sing. Tree Scanning: A Method for Using Haplotype Trees in Phenotype/Genotype Association Studies. Genetics 169:441-453, 2005.
  132. Brisson, J. A., D. C. De Toni, I. Duncan, and A. R. Templeton. Abdominal pigmentation variation in Drosophila polymorpha: Geographic variation in the trait, and underlying phylogeography. Evolution 59:1046-1059, 2005.
  133. Maxwell, T., M. Ameyaw, S. Pritchard, N. Thornton, G. Folayan, J. Githang’a, A. Indalo, M. Tariq, A. Mobarek, D. Price Evans, D. Ofori-Adjei, A. Templeton, and H. McLeod. Beta-2 adrenergic receptor genotypes and haplotypes in different ethnic groups. International Journal of Molecular Medicine 16:573-580, 2005.
  134. Posada, D., T. J. Maxwell, and A. R. Templeton. TreeScan: a bioinformatic application to search for genotype/phenotype associations using haplotype trees. Bioinformatics 21:2130-2132, 2005.
  135. Templeton, A., R. Haplotype Trees and Modern Human Origins. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 48:33-59, 2005.
  136. Posada, D., K. A. Crandall, and A. R. Templeton. Nested clade analysis statistics. Molecular Ecology Notes 6:590-593, 2006.
  137. Rosenberg, S., A. Templeton, P. Feigin, D. Lancet, J. Beckmann, S. Selig, D. Hamer, and K. Skorecki. The association of DNA sequence variation at the MAOA genetic locus with quantitative behavioural traits in normal males. Human Genet. 120:447-459, 2006.
  138. Templeton, A. R. God of the Gaps versus Life Is a Miracle: Two Perspectives on Evolution and Religion. Forum on Public Policy 2:882-893, 2006.
  139. Templeton, A. R. Shared history of humans and gut bacteria: Evolutionary togetherness: coupled evolution of humans and a pathogen. Heredity 98:337-338, 2007.
  140. Smith, A. R., and A. R. Templeton. Using prescribed fire to restore evolutionary processes at Ozark National Scenic Riverways: The case of the collared lizard. Park Science 24:84-88, 2007.
  141. Templeton, A. R. Genetics and recent human evolution. Evolution 61:1507-1519, 2007.
  142. Östman, Ö., N. W. Griffin, J. L. Strasburg, J. A. Brisson, A. R. Templeton, T. M. Knight, and J. M. Chase. Habitat area affects arthropod communities directly and indirectly through top predators. Ecography 30:359-366, 2007.
  143. Strasburg J. L., M. Kearney, C. Moritz, and A. R. Templeton. Combining phylogeography with distribution modeling: multiple Pleistocene range expansions in a parthenogenetic gecko from the Australian arid zone. PLoS ONE. 2, e760, 2007.
  144. Bar-David, S., O. Segev, N. Peleg, N. Hill, A. R. Templeton, C. B. Schultz, and L. Blaustein. Long-Distance Movements by Fire Salamanders (Salamandra infraimmaculata) and Implications for Habitat Fragmentation. Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution 53:143 – 159, 2007.
  145. Templeton, A. R., J. L. Neuwald, H. Brazeal, and R. J. Robertson. Restoring Demographic Processes in Translocated Populations: The Case of Collared Lizards in the Missouri Ozarks Using Prescribed Forest Fires. Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution 53:179–196, 2007.
  146. Gu C. C., K. Yu, S. Ketkar, A. R. Templeton, and D.C. Rao. On transferability of genome-wide tagSNPs. Genetic Epidemiology 32:89-97, 2008.
  147. Bercovici, S., D. Geiger, L. Shlush, K. Skorecki, and A. Templeton. Panel construction for mapping in admixed populations via expected mutual information. Genome Research 18:661-667, 2008.
  148. Templeton, A. R. Nested clade analysis: an extensively validated method for strong phylogeographic inference. Molecular Ecology 17:1877-1880, 2008.
  149. Templeton, A., R. The reality and importance of founder speciation in evolution. BioEssays 30:470-479, 2008.
  150. Shlush, L. I., D. M. Behar, G. Yudkovsky, A. Templeton, Y. Hadid, F. Basis, M. Hammer, S. Itzkovitz, and K. Skorecki. The Druze: A population genetic refugium of the Near East. PLoS ONE 3:e2105, 2008.
  151. Templeton, A. R. Statistical hypothesis testing in intraspecific phylogeography: nested clade phylogeographical analysis vs. approximate Bayesian computation. Molecular Ecology 18(2): 319-331, 2009.
  152. Climer, S., G. Jager, A. R. Templeton, and W. Zhang. How frugal is Mother Nature with haplotypes? Bioinformatics 25:68-74, 2009.
  153. Kowalski, J., S. J. Gange, M. F. Schneider, H.-L. Tsai, A. Templeton, Q. Shao, G. W. Zhang, M.-F. Yeh, M. Young, and R. B. Markham. Relationship of Injection Drug Use, Antiretroviral Therapy Resistance, and Genetic Diversity in the HIV-1 pol Gene. JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 50:381-389 310, 2009.
  154. Gershoni, M., A. R. Templeton, and D. Mishmar. Mitochondrial bioenergetics as a major motive force of speciation. BioEssays 31:642-650, 2009.
  155. Templeton, A., M. Kramer, J. Jarvis, J. Kowalski, S. Gange, M. Schneider, Q. Shao, G. W. Zhang, M.-F. Yeh, H.-L. Tsai, H. Zhang, and R. Markham. Multiple-infection and recombination in HIV-1 within a longitudinal cohort of women. Retrovirology 6:54-65, 2009.
  156. Templeton, A. R. Why does a method that fails continue to be used: the answer. Evolution 63(4): 807-812, 2009.
  157. Braude, S., and A. R. Templeton. Understanding the multiple meanings of ‘inbreeding’ and ‘effective size’ for genetic management of African rhinoceros populations. African Journal of Ecology 47:546-555, 2009.
  158. Templeton, A. R. On the origin of species: A 21st century perspective on species. ANAIS 26: 4-11, 2009.
  159. Martins, F., A. Templeton, A. Pavan, B. Kohlbach, and J. Morgante. Phylogeography of the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus): Marked population structure, Neotropical Pleistocene vicariance and incongruence between nuclear and mtDNA markers. BMC Evolutionary Biology 9:294, 2009.
  160. Templeton, A. R. Natural Selection from Darwin to the 21st Century. Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution 55:207-214, 2009.
  161. Templeton, A. The diverse applications of cladistic analysis of molecular evolution, with special reference to nested clade analysis. International Journal of Molecular Sciences 11:124-139, 2010.
  162. Templeton, A. R. Coalescent-based, maximum likelihood inference in phylogeography. Mol. Ecol. 19:431-435, 2010.
  163. Templeton, A. R. Coherent and incoherent inference in phylogeography and human evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107:6376-6381, 2010.
  164. Segev, O., N. Hill, A. R. Templeton, and L. Blaustein. Population size, structure and phenology of an endangered salamander at temporary and permanent breeding sites. Journal for Nature Conservation 18:189-195, 2010.
  165. Templeton, A. R. Has human evolution stopped? Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal 1:e0006, 2010.
  166. Templeton, A. R. Correcting Approximate Bayesian Computation. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 25:488-489, 2010.
  167. Templeton, A. R. Reply to Berger et al.: Improving ABC. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107:E158, 2010.
  168. Shlush, L., S. Bercovici, W. Wasser, G. Yudkovsky, A. Templeton, D. Geiger, and K. Skorecki. Admixture mapping of end stage kidney disease genetic susceptibility using estimated mutual information ancestry informative markers. BMC Medical Genomics 3/47:12 pages, 2010.
  169. Hochberg, Z., and A. R. Templeton. Evolutionary perspective in skin color, vitamin D and its receptor. HORMONES 9:307-311, 2010.
  170. Climer, S., A. R. Templeton, and W. Zhang. SplittingHeirs: inferring haplotypes by optimizing resultant dense graphs. Proceedings of the First ACM International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. ACM, Niagara Falls, New York: 127-136, 2010.
  171. Coventry, A., L. M. Bull-Otterson, X. Liu, A. G. Clark, T. J. Maxwell, J. Crosby, J. E. Hixson, T. J. Rea, D. M. Muzny, L. R. Lewis, D. A. Wheeler, A. Sabo, C. Lusk, K. G. Weiss, H. Akbar, A. Cree, A. C. Hawes, I. Newsham, R. T. Varghese, D. Villasana, S. Gross, V. Joshi, J. Santibanez, M. Morgan, K. Chang, W. H. Iv, A. R. Templeton, E. Boerwinkle, R. Gibbs, and C. F. Sing. Deep resequencing reveals excess rare recent variants consistent with explosive population growth. Nature Communications 1:131, 2010.
  172. Davit, C. and A. R. Templeton. Collared lizard recovery in the Ozarks. Missouri Prairie Journal 32:18-21, 2011.
  173. Templeton, A. R., H. Brazeal, and J. L. Neuwald. The transition from isolated patches to a metapopulation in the eastern collared lizard in response to prescribed fires. Ecology 92:1736-1747, 2011. **Featured on Cover and placed by the Faculty of 1000 in their library of the top 2% of published articles in biology and medicine.
  174. Koester, B., T. J. Rea, A. R. Templeton, A. S. Szalay, and C. F. Sing. Long-range autocorrelations of CpG islands in the human genome. PLoS One 7:e29889, 2012.
  175. Renan, S., E. Speyer, N. Shahar, T. Gueta, A. R. Templeton, and S. Bar-David. A factorial design experiment as a pilot study for noninvasive genetic sampling. Molecular Ecology Resources 12:1040-1047, 2012.
  176. Neuwald J. L. and A. R. Templeton. Genetic restoration in the eastern collared lizard under prescribed woodland burning. Molecular Ecology 22(14):3666-3679, 2013.
  177. Geahlen, J. H., C. Lapid, K. Thorell, I. Nikolskiy, W. J. Huh, E. L. Oates, J. K. M. Lennerz, X. Tian, V. G. Weis, S. S. Khurana, S. B. Lundin, A. R. Templeton, and J. C. Mills. Evolution of the human gastrokine locus and confounding factors regarding the pseudogenicity of GKN3. Physiological Genomics 45:667-683, 2013.
  178. Blank, L., I. Sinai, S. Bar-David, N. Peleg, O. Segev, A. Sadeh, N. M. Kopelman, A. R. Templeton, J. Merilä, and L. Blaustein. Genetic population structure of the endangered fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) at the southernmost extreme of its distribution. Animal Conservation 16:412-421, 2013.
  179. Templeton, A. R. Biological races in humans. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44:262-271, 2013.
  180. Climer, S., A. R. Templeton, and W. Zhang. Allele-Specific Network Reveals Combinatorial Interaction That Transcends Small Effects in Psoriasis GWAS. PLoS Computational Biology 10, e1003766, 2014.
  181. Gueta, T., A. R. Templeton, and S. Bar-David. Development of genetic structure in a heterogeneous landscape over a short time frame: the reintroduced Asiatic wild ass. Conservation Genetics 15:1231-1242, 2014.
  182. Greenbaum, G., A. R. Templeton, Y. Zarmi, and S. Bar-David. Allelic richness following population founding events – A stochastic modeling framework incorporating gene flow and genetic drift. Plos One 9:e115203, 2014.
  183. Kershenbaum, A., L. Blank, I. Sinai, J. Merilä, L. Blaustein, and A. Templeton. Landscape influences on dispersal behaviour: a theoretical model and empirical test using the fire salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata. Oecologia 175:509-520, 2014.
  184. Climer, S., A. R. Templeton, and W. Zhang. Human gephyrin is encompassed within giant functional noncoding ying-yang sequences. Nat Commun 6:11 pgs. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7534, 2015.
  185. Renan, S., G. Greenbaum, N. Shahar, A. R. Templeton, A. Bouskila, and S. Bar-David. Stochastic modelling of shifts in allele frequencies reveals a strongly polygynous mating system in the re-introduced Asiatic wild ass. Molecular Ecology 24:1433-1446, 2015.
  186. Zhang, Q., H. Abel, A. Wells, P. Lenzini, F. Gomez, M. A. Province, A. R. Templeton, G. M. Weinstock, N. H. Salzman, and I. B. Borecki. Selection of models for the analysis of risk-factor trees: leveraging biological knowledge to mine large sets of risk factors with application to microbiome data. Bioinformatics 31:1607-1613, 2015.
  187. Czypionka, T., T. Krugman, J. Altmüller, L. Blaustein, S. Steinfartz, A. R. Templeton, and A. W. Nolte. Ecological transcriptomics – a non-lethal sampling approach for endangered fire salamanders. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 6:1417-1425, 2015.
  188. Greenbaum, G., A. R. Templeton, and S. Bar-David. Inference and analysis of population structure using genetic data and network theory. Genetics 202:1299-1312, 2016.
  189. Tiosano, D., L. Audi, S. Climer, W. Zhang, A. R. Templeton, M. Fernández-Cancio, R. Gershoni-Baruch, J. M. Sánchez-Muro, M. El Kholy, and Z. Hochberg. Latitudinal clines of the human Vitamin D Receptor and skin color genes. G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics 6:1251-1266, 2016.
  190. Saward-Arav, D., A. Sadeh, M. Mangel, A. R. Templeton, and L. Blaustein. Oviposition responses of two mosquito species to pool size and predator presence: varying trade-offs between desiccation and predation risks. Israel Journal of Ecology & Evolution 62:143-148, 2016.
  191. Blaustein, L., O. Segev, V. Rovelli, S. Bar-David, L. Blank, A. Polevikov, N. Pezaro, T. Krugman, S. Showstack, A. Koplovich, L. Ozeri, and A. R. Templeton. Compassionate approaches for the conservation and protection of fire salamanders. Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution 63: 43-51, 2017.
  192. Goedbloed, D. J., T. Czypionka, J. Altmuller, A. Rodriguez, E. Kupfer, O. Segev, L. Blaustein, A. R. Templeton, A. W. Nolte, and S. Steinfartz, Parallel habitat acclimatization is realized by the expression of different genes in two closely related salamander species (genus Salamandra). Heredity 119: 429-437, doi 10.1038/hdy.2017.55, 2017.
  193. Pezaro, N., V. Rovelli, O. Segev, A. R. Templeton, and L. Blaustein. Suspected rat predation on the Near Eastern Fire Salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) by selective consumption of non-toxic tissue. Zoology in the Middle East, 64: 91-93. doi: 10.1080/09397140.2017.1375199, 2018.
  194. Renan, S., E. Speyer, T. Ben-Nun, A. Ziv, G. Greenbaum, A. R. Templeton, S. Bar-David, and A. Bouskila. Fission-fusion social structure of a reintroduced ungulate: Implications for conservation. Biological Conservation 222: 261-267, 2018.
  195. Greenbaum, G., S. Renan, A. R. Templeton, A. Bouskila, D. Saltz, D. I. Rubenstein, and S. Bar-David. Revealing life-history traits by contrasting genetic estimations with predictions of effective population size. Conservation Biology 32: 817-827, 2018.
  196. Sinai, I., O. Segev, G. Weil, T. Oron, J. Merilä, A. R. Templeton, L. Blaustein, G. Greenbaum, and L. Blank. The role of landscape and history on the genetic structure of peripheral populations of the Near Eastern fire salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata, in Northern Israel. Conservation Genetics 20: 875-889, 2019.
  197. Greenbaum G, A. Rubin, A. R. Templeton, N. A. Rosenberg. Network-based hierarchical population structure analysis for large genomic data sets. Genome Research 29: 2020-2033, 2019.
  198. Walker, J., M. Mahoney, A. R. Templeton, P. McKenzie, T. E. Vogt, E. D. Cashatt, J. Smentowski, R. Day, R. Gillespie, B. Henry, J. Wiker, S. Braude, and B. Landwer. Contrasting Ozark and Great Lakes populations in the endangered Hines emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana) using ecological, genetic, and phylogeographic analyses. Conservation Science and Practice: e162, 2020.
  199. Climer, S., A. R. Templeton, M. Garvin, D. Jacobson, M. Lane, S. Hulver, B. Scheid, Z. Chen, C. Cruchaga, and W. Zhang. Synchronized genetic activities in Alzheimer’s brains revealed by heterogeneity-capturing network analysis. bioRxiv: 2020.2001.2028.923730, 2020.
  200. Sinai, I., T. Oron, G. Weil, R. Sachal, A. Koplovich, L. Blaustein, A. R. Templeton, and L. Blank. Estimating the effects of road-kills on the Fire Salamander population along a river. Journal for Nature Conservation 58: 125917, 2020.
  201. Zecherle, L. J., S. Bar-David, H. J. Nichols, A. R. Templeton, H. Hipperson, G. J. Horsburgh, and R. P. Brown. Landscape resistance affects individual habitat selection but not genetic relatedness in a reintroduced desert ungulate. Biological Conservation 252: 108845, 2020.
  202.  Sinai, I., O. Segev, A. Koplovich, A. R. Templeton, L. Blaustein, and L. Blank. Relationships among breeding site characteristics and adult population size of the fire salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata. Hydrobiologia 847: 2999-3012, 2020.
  203. Zecherle, L. J., H. J. Nichols, S. Bar-David, R. P. Brown, H. Hipperson, G. J. Horsburgh, and A. R. Templeton. Subspecies hybridization as a potential conservation tool in species reintroductions. Evolutionary Applications 14: 1216-1224, 2021.

CHAPTERS IN EDITED BOOKS (MOST PEER-REVIEWED)

  1. Sing, C.F. and A.R. Templeton.  A search for the genetic unit of selection.  In: Isozymes, IV: Genetics and Evolution.  C.L. Markert (ed.), pp. 115-129.  Academic Press, N.Y., 1975.
  2. Templeton, A.R. and E.D. Rothman.  Evolution and fine-grained environmental runs.  In: Foundatons and Applications of Decision Theory, Volume II:  Epistemic and Social Applications.  C.A. Hooker, J.J. Leach and E.F. McClennen (eds.), pp. 131-183.  Reidel Publishing Co., Dordrecht, Holland, 1978.
  3. Templeton, A.R. and M.A. Rankin.  Genetic revolutions and control of insect populations.  In: The Screwworm Problem.  R.H. Richardson (ed.), pp. 81-111.  University of Texas Press, Austin, 1978.
  4. Templeton, A.R.  Genetics of colonization and establishment of exotic species.  In: Genetics in Relation to Insect Management.  M. Hoy, J. McKelvey and C. Koehler (eds.), pp. 41-49.  Rockefeller Foundation Press, 1979.
  5. Templeton, A.R.  An informational analysis of patet in Central Javanese gamelan music.  An appendix to:  Becker, J., Traditional Music in Modern Java.  University Press of Hawaii, 1980.
  6. Templeton, A.R.  Adaptation and the integration of evolutionary forces.  In: Perspectives on Evolution.  R. Milkman (ed.), pp. 15-31.  Sinauer, Sunderland, MA, 1982.
  7. Templeton, A.R.  The prophecies of parthenogenesis.  In:  Evolution and Genetics of Life Histories.  H. Dingle and J.P. Hegmann (eds.), pp. 75-101.  Springer-Verlag, New York, 1982.
  8. Templeton, A.R. and J.S. Johnston.  Life history evolution under pleiotropy and K-selection in a natural population of Drosophila mercatorum.  In: Ecological Genetics and Evolution:  The Cactus-Yeast-Drosophila Model System.  J.S.F. Barker and W.T. Starmer (eds.), pp. 225-239.  Academic Press, New York, 1982.
  9. Johnston, J.S. and A.R. Templeton.  Dispersal and clines in Opuntia  breeding Drosophila mercatorum  and D. hydei  at Kamuela, Hawaii.  In: Ecological Genetics and Evolution:  The Cactus-Yeast-Drosophila  Model System.  J.S.F. Barker and W.T.  Starmer (eds.), pp. 241-256.  Academic Press, New York, 1982.
  10. Templeton, A.R.Genetic architectures of speciation.  In: Mechanisms of Speciation.  C. Barigozzi (ed.), pp. 105-121.  Alan R. Liss, Inc., New York, 1982.
  11. Templeton, A.R.Convergent evolution and nonparametric inferences from restriction data and DNA sequences.  In:  Statistical Analysis of DNA Sequence Data.  B.S. Weir (ed.), pp. 151-179.  Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, 1983.
  12. Templeton, A.R. and B. Read.The elimination of inbreeding depression in a captive herd of Speke’s gazelle.  In:  Genetics and Conservation:  A Reference for Managing Wild Animal and Plant Populations.  C.M. Schonewald-Cox, S.M. Chambers, B. MacBryde, and L. Thomas (eds), pp. 241-261.   Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass., 1983.
  13. Templeton, A.R.The evolution of life histories under pleiotropic constraints and K-selection.  In: Population Biology.  H.I. Freedman and C. Strobeck (eds), pp. 64-71.  Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1983.
  14. Templeton, A.R.Natural and experimental parthenogenesis.  In: The Genetics and Biology of Drosophila, Vol. 3C.  M. Ashburner, H.L. Carson, and J.N. Thompson (eds.), pp. 343-398.  Academic Press, London, 1983.
  15. Templeton, A.R. and L.E. Gilbert.Population genetics and the coevolution of mutualisms.  In:  The Biology of Mutualism:  Ecology and Evolution.  D. H. Boucher (ed), pp. 128-144.  Crom Helm, London, 1985.
  16. Templeton, A.R.Relation of humans to African Apes:  a statistical appraisal of diverse types of data.  In:  Evolutionary Processes and Theory.  S. Karlin and E. Nevo (eds.), pp. 365-388.  Academic Press, New York, 1986.
  17. Templeton, A.R.The relation between speciation mechanisms and macroevolutionary patterns.  In:  Evolutionary Processes and Theory.  S. Karlin and E. Nevo (eds.), pp. 497-512.  Academic Press, New York, 1986.
  18. Templeton, A.R.Coadaptation and outbreeding depression.  In:  Conservation Biology:  Science of Scarcity and Diversity.  M. Soule (ed), pp. 105-116.  Sinauer, Sunderland, Massuchusetts, 1986.
  19. Templeton, A.R.Genetic systems and evolutionary rates.  In:  Rates of Evolution.  K.S.W. Campbell and M.F. Day (eds.), pp. 218-234.  Allen & Unwin, London, 1987.
  20. Templeton, A.R.The role of genetics in conservation biology.  In:  AAZPA Regional Conference Proceedings.  pp. 647-651.  American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquaria, 1987.
  21. Templeton, A.R.Inferences on natural population structure from genetic studies on captive mammalian populations.  In:  Mammalian Dispersal Patterns.  B.D. Chepko-Sade and Z.T. Halpin (eds.), pp. 257-272.  The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987.
  22. Templeton, A.R., J.S. Johnston, and C.F. Sing.The proximate and ultimate control of aging in Drosophila  and humans.  In:  Evolution of Longevity in Animals.  A.D. Woodhead and K.H. Thompson (eds.), pp. 123-133.  Plenum Press, New York, 1987.
  23. Templeton, A.R. and J.S. Johnston.The measured genotype approach to ecological genetics.  In:  Population Genetics and Evolution.  G. de Jong (ed.), pp 138-146, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1988.
  24. Sing, C.F., E. Boerwinkle, P.P. Moll, and A.R. Templeton.Characterization of genes affecting quantitative traits in humans.  In:  Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Quantitative Genetics.  B.S. Weir, E.G. Eisen, M.M. Goodman, and G. Namkoong (eds.), pp. 250-269.  Sinauer, Sunderland, MA, 1988.
  25. Templeton, A.R.Founder effects and the evolution of reproductive isolation.  In:  Genetics, Speciation and the Founder Principle.  L.V. Giddings, K. Kaneshiro, and W. Anderson (eds.), pp. 329-344.  Oxford University Press, New York, 1989.
  26. Templeton, A.R.The meaning of species and speciation:  a genetic perspective.  In:  Speciation and its Consequences.  D. Otte and J.A. Endler (eds.), pp. 3-27.  Sinauer, Sunderland, Mass., 1989.
  27. Templeton, A.R., H. Hollocher, S. Lawler, and J.S. Johnston.The ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila mercatorum.  In:  Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics of Drosophila.  J.S.F. Barker (ed.), pp. 17-35. Plenum Press, New York, 1990.
  28. Templeton, A.R.Genetics and conservation biology.  In:  Species Conservation:  A Population-Biological Approach.  A. Seitz and V.Loeschcke (eds.), pp.15-29.  Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 1991.
  29. Templeton, A.R.Off-site breeding of animals and implications for plant conservation strategies.  In: Genetics and Conservation of Rare Plants.  D.A. Falk and K.E. Holsinger (eds), pp.182-194.  Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1991.
  30. Templeton, A. R. The meaning of species and speciation:  A genetic perspective.  In: The Units of Evolution: Essays on the Nature of Species.  M. Ereshefsky (ed.), pp. 149-183. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1992.
  31. Templeton, A.R. and B. Read.Inbreeding:  One Word, Several Meanings, Much Confusion.  In: Conservation Genetics,V. Loeschcke, J. Tomiuk, and S.K. Jain (eds.), pp. 91-106.  Birkhäuser–Verlag, Basel, 1994.
  32. Templeton, A. R.The role of molecular genetics in speciation studies.  In: Molecular Ecology and Evolution: Approaches and Applications.  B. Schierwater, B. Streit, G. P. Wagner and R. DeSalle, eds. Pp. 455-477.  Basel, Birkhäuser-Verlag, 1994.
  33. Crandall, K. A., A. R. Templeton and C. F. Sing.Intraspecific phylogenetics:  Problems and solutions.  In: Models in Phylogeny Reconstruction.  R. W. Scotland, D. J. Siebert and D. M. Williams, eds. Pp. 273-297.  Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1994.
  34. Templeton, A. R.Biodiversity at the molecular genetic level:  experiences from disparate macroorganisms.  In: Biodiversity:  Measurement and Estimation.  D. L. Hawksworth, ed. Pp. 59-64.  London, Chapman & Hall, 1995.
  35. Sing, C. F., M. B. Haviland, A. R. Templeton and S. L. Reilly.Alternative genetic strategies for predicting risk of atherosclerosis.  In: Atherosclerosis X.  Excerpta Medica International Congress Series.  F. P. Woodford, J. Davignon and A. D. Sniderman, eds. Pp. 638-644.  Amsterdam, Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., 1995.
  36. Templeton, A. R.Chapter 5.2.1:  Genetic diversity and ecosystem functioning.  In: Global Biodiversity Assessment.  V. H. E. E. Heywood, ed. Pp. 285-289.  Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, for the United Nations Environment Programme, 1995.
  37. Crandall, K. A. and A. R. Templeton.Applications of intraspecific phylogenetics.  In: New Uses for New Phylogenies.  P. Harvey, A. J. L. Brown, J. M. Smith and S. Nee, eds. Pp. 81-99.  Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  38. Templeton, A. R.Cladistic approaches to identifying determinants of variability in multifactorial phenotypes and the evolutionary significance of variation in the human genome.  In: Variation in the Human Genome.  G. Cardew, ed. Pp. 259-283.  Chichester, John Wiley & Sons, 1996.
  39. Templeton, A. R.Translocation in conservation.  In: Biodiversity in Managed Landscapes:  Theory and Practice.  R. C. Szaro and D. W. Johnston, eds. Pp. 315-325.  Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  40. Templeton, A. R. and N. J. Georgiadis.A landscape approach to conservation genetics:  conserving evolutionary processes in the African Bovidae.  In: Conservation Genetics:  Case Histories From Nature.  J. C. Avise and J. L. Hamrick, eds. Pp. 398-430.  New York, Chapman & Hall, 1996.
  41. Templeton, A. R.Testing the out of Africa replacement hypothesis with mitochondrial DNA data.  In: Conceptual Issues in Modern Human Origins Research.  G. A. Clark and C. M. Willermet, eds. Pp. 329-360.  New York, Aldine de Gruyter, 1997.
  42. Templeton, A. R.Linkage mapping versus the candidate gene approach.  Proceedings of the 6th World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production 26: 175-182, 1998.
  43. Templeton, A. R.Species and speciation:  geography, population structure, ecology, and gene trees.  In: Endless Forms:  Species and Speciation.  D. J. Howard and S. H. Berlocher, eds. Pp. 32-43.  Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1998.
  44. Templeton, A. R.The role of molecular genetics in speciation studies.  In: Molecular Approaches to Ecology and Evolution.  R. DeSalle and B. Schierwater, eds. Pp. 131-156.  Basel, Birkhäuser-Verlag, 1998.
  45. Kardia, S. L. R., J. Stengård and A. R. Templeton.An evolutionary perspective on the genetic architecture of susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.  In: Evolution in Health and Disease.  S. C. Stearns, ed. Pp. 231-245.  Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999.
  46. Templeton, A. R.Using gene trees to infer species from testable null hypothesis:  cohesion species in the Spalax ehrenbergi complex.  In: Evolutionary Theory and Processes:  Modern Perspectives, Papers in Honour of Eviatar Nevo.  S. P. Wasser, ed. Pp. 171-192.  Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.
  47. Crandall, K. A. and A. R. Templeton.Statistical approaches to detecting recombination.  In: The Evolution of HIV.  K. A. Crandall, ed. Pp. 153-176.  Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.
  48. Templeton, A. R.Epistasis and complex traits.  In: Epistasis and the Evolutionary Process.  J. B. Wolf, E. D. Brodie III, and M. J. Wade, eds. Pp. 41-57.  Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000.
  49. Templeton, A. R. The genetic and evolutionary significance of human races. In: Race and Intelligence: Separating Science From Myth. J. M. Fish, ed. Pp. 31-56. Mahwah, New Jersey, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.
  50. Templeton, A. R. Human races in the context of recent human evolution:a molecular genetic perspective. In: Genetic Nature/Culture.   A. H. Goodman, D. Heath and M. S. Lindee, eds. Pp. 234-257. University of California Press, Berkeley, 2003.
  51. Templeton, A. R. A maximum likelihood framework for cross validation of phylogeographic hypotheses. Pp. 209-230 in S. P. Wasser, ed. Evolutionary Theory and Processes: Modern Horizons. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2004.
  52. Templeton, A. R. Using Haplotype Trees for Phylogeographic and Species Inference in Fish Populations. Pp. 7-20 in A. J. Gharrett, R. G. Gustafson, J. L. Nielson, J. E. Seeb, L. W. Seeb, W. W. Smoker, G. H. Thorgaard and R. L. Wilmot, eds. Genetics of Subpolar Fish and Invertebrates. Kluwer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2004.
  53. Templeton, A. R. When does life begin?An evolutionary genetic answer to a central ethical question. Pp. 1-20 in S. Blazer and E. Z. Zimmer, eds. The Embryo from Conception to Birth.  Scientific Discovery, Medical and Ethical Dilemmas. Karger, Basel, 2005.
  54. Templeton, A. R. Out of Africa again and again.Pp. 617-625 in R. L. Ciochon and J. G. Fleagle, eds.  The Human Evolution Source Book, 2nd Edition.  Pearson/Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2006.
  55. Templeton, A. R. Human races:a genetic and evolutionary perspective.  Pp. 657-673 in R. L. Ciochon and J. G. Fleagle, eds.  The Human Evolution Source Book, 2nd Edition.  Pearson/Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2006.
  56. Templeton, A. R. Population biology and population genetics of Pleistocene Hominins. Pp.1825-1859 in W. Henke, H. Rothe and I. Tattersall, eds. Handbook of Palaeoanthropology, Vol 3. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2007.
  57. Bercovici, S., D. Geiger, L. Shlush, K. Skorecki, and A. Templeton. Panel Construction for Mapping in Admixed Populations Via Expected Mutual Information. Pp. 435-449 in Research in Computational Molecular Biology. Springer, Berlin / Heidelberg, 2008.
  58. Templeton, A. R. Gene Flow, Haplotype Patterns and Modern Human Origins in D. N. Cooper, and H. Kehrer-Sawatzki, eds. Handbook of Human Molecular Evolution. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co., Weinheim, Germany, 2008.
  59. Templeton, A. R. Testing the null hypothesis of reproductive isolation between two geographical regions in a specific time period with multi-locus nested clade analysis. Pp. 81-84 in A. Korol, and S. P. Wasser, eds. The Evolution of Eibi Nevo (In Honor of His 80th Birthday). Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel, 2009.
  60. Templeton, A. R. The evolutionary connection between senescence and childhood growth and development. Pp. 58-66 in Z. Hochberg, ed. Evo-Devo of Child Growth: Treatise on Child Growth and Human Evolution. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, 2012.
  61. Templeton, A. R. Gene Flow, Haplotype Patterns and Modern Human Origins. Article A20795, Version 2.0.  eLS, Citable Reviews in the Life Sciences.  www.els.net.  Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co., Weinheim, Germany, 2012.
  62. Templeton A. R. Evolution and Notions of Human Race. Pp. 801-808 in Losos JB, Baum DA, Futuyma DJ, Hoekstra HE, Lenski RE, Moore AJ, Peichel CL, Schluter D, and Whitlock MC, eds. The Princeton Guide to Evolution. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014.
  63. Templeton A. R. The Future of Human Evolution. Pp 809-816 In Losos JB, Baum DA, Futuyma DJ, Hoekstra HE, Lenski RE, Moore AJ, Peichel CL, Schluter D, and Whitlock MC, eds. The Princeton Guide to Evolution. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014.
  64. Templeton, A. R. Founder effect speciation.in J. B. Losos, editor. Oxford Bibliographies in Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014. Updated 2018.  http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/obo/page/evolutionary-biology.
  65. Templeton, A. R. Population Biology and Population Genetics of Pleistocene Hominins. Pp. 2331-2370 in W. Henke, and I. Tattersall, eds. Handbook of Paleoanthropology, Vol 3 Phylogeny of Hominins. Springer Berlin Heidelberg.doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-27800-6_60-5, 2015.
  66. Bar-David, S., S. Renan, T. Gueta, E. Speyer, N. Shahar, G. Greenbaum, I. Goodman, A. Bouskila, and A. R. Templeton. Genetic diversity of the reintroduced Asiatic wild ass in Israel: from the breeding core to the current wild population. Pp. 95-96 in J. Ransom, and P. Kaczensky, eds. Wild Equids: Ecology, Conservation, and Management. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2016.
  67. Templeton, A. R. Evolution and notions of human race. Pages 346-361 in J. B. Losos and R. E. Lenski, editors. How Evolution Shapes Our Lives: Essays on Biology and Society. Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford, 2016.
  68. Templeton, A. R. The future of human evolution. Pages 362-379 in J. B. Losos and R. E. Lenski, editors. How Evolution Shapes Our Lives: Essays on Biology and Society. Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford, 2016.
  69. Templeton, A. R. World dispersals and genetic diversity of mankind:  The out-of-Africa theory and its challenges. Pp. 65-83 in M. Tibayrenc, and F. J. Ayala, eds. On Human Nature:  Biology, Psychology, Ethics, Politics, and Religion. Academic Press-Elsevier, London, 2017.
  70. Sussman, R., G. Allen, and A. R. Templeton. Genetics and the origins of race. Pp. 3-15 in W. Tate, N. Staudt, and A. Macrander, eds. The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue. Emerald Group Publishing, Bingley, UK., 2017.
  71. Templeton, A. R. Measuring biodiversity and monitoring ecological and evolutionary processes with genetic and genomic tools. Pp. 251-265 in J. Garson, A. Plutynski, and S. Sarkar, editors. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. Routledge, New York, 2017.
  72. Templeton, A. R. 2018. Hypothesis compatibility versus hypothesis tesing of models of human evolution. In: Schwartz, J. H. (Ed.) Rethinking Human Evolution. MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 109-128.

ABSTRACTS (published in journals)

  1. Templeton, A.R. and C.F. Sing.  Parthenogenesis as a strategy for studying genetic organization.  Isozyme Bulletin 5: 1972.
  2. Sing, C.F. and A.R. Templeton.  Parthenogenesis as a biological design to examine the neutral gene hypothesis.  Isozyme Bulletin 6: 1973.
  3. Templeton, A.R. and C.F. Sing.  Coadaptation in parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum.  Genetics 74: s274, 1973.
  4. Templeton, A.R. and C.F. Sing.  Coadaptation in parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum.  Isozyme Bulletin 6: 1973.
  5. Rothman, E.D., A.R. Templeton and C.F. Sing.  Analysis of population structure.  Genetics 74: s234, 1973.
  6. Templeton, A.R.  The capacity for parthenogenesis in wild-caught females of Drosophila mercatorum.  Isozyme Bulletin 8: 1975.
  7. Templeton, A.R.  Genetics of the bisexual-unisexual transition in Drosophila mercatorum.  Isozyme Bulletin 10: 1977.
  8. Templeton, A.R.  The genetic and physiological basis of coadaptation in parthenogenetic strains of Drosophila mercatorum.  XIV International Congress of Genetics, Abstracts of Contributed Papers, C.16, 1978.
  9. Templeton, A.R.  Some possible relationships between rapid speciation, small effective size, and breeding systems.  In: The Dynamics of Speciation in Plants and Animals.  H.-I. Oka and O. Kitagawa, eds.  Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1978.
  10. DeSalle, R. and A.R. Templeton. Molecular basis of the abnormal abdomen phenotype in Drosophila mercatorum. Genetics 104: s21, 1983.
  11. Templeton, A.R. Natural selection and ribosomal DNA in Drosophila. Genome 30, Suppl. 1: 29, 1988.
  12. Templeton, A.R. Habitat fragmentation: genetic problems and solutions.  Genetics 122: s12, 1989.
  13. Sing CF, Haviland MB, Templeton AR, Reilly SL. Alternative genetic strategies for predicting risk of atherosclerosis. Xth International Symposium on Atherosclerosis Montreal, Canada, October 9-14, 1994.
  14. Matioli, S. R. and A. R. Templeton. Complexos gênicos coadaptados para características morfológicas de Drosophila mercatorum. Rev. Bras. Genet. 18(3 (Supplement)): 280, 1995.
  15. Sing CF, Haviland MB, Templeton AR, Reilly SL. Alternative genetic strategies for predicting risk of atherosclerosis. MDC Symposium on Complex Genetic Diseases. Berlin, Germany, September 27-29, 1995.
  16. Templeton, A. R., and B. Read. 1996. Inbreeding: One Word, Several Meanings, Much Confusion. Biological Conservation 75:311.
  17. Haviland MB, Templeton AR, Ferrell RE, Sing CF. Identification of haplotypes of the apolipoprotein (Apo) B gene region hypothesized to carry functional DNA variations using a cladistic analysis. The American Society of Human Genetics 46th Annual Meeting San Francisco, CA, October 29-November 2, 1996.
  18. Templeton, A. R. A critique of the use of genetic data in analyzing human origins. American Journal of Human Biology 9(1): 122, 1997.
  19. Hammer, M.F., S. L. Zegura, A. Bergen, J. C. Long, W. Klitz, R. C. Griffiths, A. R. Templeton, L. P. Osipova, O. L. Posakh, T. M. Karafet. New World Y chromosome founder haplotypes and the peopling of the Americas. Am. J. Phys. Anthrop. (Suppl. 28) 81: 144, 1999.
  20. Templeton, A. R. Evolution of haplotypes and complex diseases. Am. J. Phys. Anthrop. (Suppl. 28) 81: 264-265, 1999.
  21. Bates, B. R., A. Templeton, P. J. Achter, T. M. Harris, and C. M. Condit. A focus group study of public understanding of genetic risk factors: The case of “a gene for heart disease”. American Journal of Human Genetics 71S:380, 2002.
  22. Clark AG, Boerwinkle E, Hixson JE, Templeton AR, Sing CF. Genomic approaches to common chronic disease. Centers for Cell Dynamics Research Symposium: Predictive Models of Complex Systems, NIGMS Friday Harbor, June 3-7, 2006.
  23. Climer, S., Templeton, A. R. & Zhang, W. A dense graph model for haplotype inference. in 12th Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB) Poster Book 265–266, 2008.
  24. Segev O., Silberbush A., Peleg N., Templeton A.R. and Blaustein. L. Population size and breeding-site threats of the fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) at selected breeding sites on Mt. Carmel and Lower Galilee. Israel Journal of Zoology 55: 300, 2009.
  25. Kovesdy CP, Lu JL, Molnar MZ, Davis RL, Skorecki K, Templeton AR, Boulware LE, Norris K, Kalantar-Zadeh K.FP320 influenza vaccination and incidence of CKD: effect modification by geographical ancestry. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 30: iii174-iii175, 2015.

BOOK REVIEWS

  1. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Genetics of Speciation  edited by D.L. Jameson.  American Journal of Human Genetics 31: 88-89, 1979.
  2. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Macroevolution:  Pattern and Process  by S.M. Stanley.  Evolution 34: 1224-1227, 1980.
  3. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Principles of Population Genetics  by D. Hartl.  Quart. Rev. Biol. 56: 75-76, 1981.
  4. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Evolution and Speciation  edited by W.R. Atchley and D.S. Woodruff.  Sci. 214: 900-901, 1981.
  5. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Basic Population Genetics  by B. Wallace.  Quart. Rev. Biol. 57: 187-188, 1982.
  6. Templeton, A.R.  Review of The Material Basis of Evolution by R. Goldschmidt.  Paleobiology 8: 474-481, 1982.
  7. Templeton, A.R.  Review of The Evolutionary Biology of Colonizing Species  by P. Parsons.  Ecology 66: 1691, 1985.
  8. Templeton, A.R.  Review of Species and Speciation  edited by E.S. Vrba.  Evolution 41: 233-235, 1987.
  9. Templeton, A.R.  Review of The Natural History of Inbreeding and Outbreeding edited by N.W. Thornhill.  Conservation Biol. 8: 608-610, 1994.
  10. Templeton, A.R. Review of Species Evolution: The Role of Chromosome Change by Max King.  Quart. Rev. Biol. 70: 76, 1995.
  11. Templeton, A. R. Review of Speciation and the Recognition Concept: Theory and Application  edited by D. M. Lambert and H. G. Spencer.  Amer. Sci. 85: 384-386, 1997.
  12. Templeton, A. R. Review of Race and Human Evolution by Wolpoff,M. and Caspari,R.  Current Anthropology 38(5): 921-922, 1997.
  13. Templeton, A. R. Applying genetics to species conservation: a review of Genetics and the Extinction of Speciesedited by L. F. Landweber and A. P. Dobson.  BioSci 50: 539-540, 2000.
  14. Templeton A. R. Review of Genetic Effects on Environmental Vulnerability to Disease, Based on a Novartis Foundation Symposium edited by Sir Michael Rutter. The Quarterly Review of Biology 85, 107-107, 2010.
  15. Templeton, A. R. Review of Introduction to Conservation Genetics by R. Frankham, J. D. Ballou, and D. A. Briscoe. The Quarterly Review of Biology 86:56, 2011.

ARTICLE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FACULTY OPINIONS (FORMERLY FACULTY OF 1000)

  1. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Albert CH et al., Conserv Biol 2017 31(6):1383-1396]. In Faculty Opinions, 10 Nov 2017; 10.3410/f.727481916.793538587
  2. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Renan S et al., Mol Ecol 201726(24):6801-6812]. In Faculty Opinions, 12 Jan 2018; 10.3410/f.732280825.793541226
  3. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Shanas U et al., Can J Zool 2018 96(5):466-472]. In Faculty Opinions, 18 May 2018; 10.3410/f.733204846.793545759
  4. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Olsen SL et al., Biodivers Conserv 2018 27(9):2329-2361]. In Faculty Opinions, 14 Nov 2018; 10.3410/f.733600750.793552611
  5. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Fahrig L, Glob Ecol Biogeogr 2019 28(1):33-41]. In Faculty Opinions, 23 Jan 2019; 10.3410/f.734861791.793555087
  6. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Lai YT et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2019 116(6):2152-2157]. In Faculty Opinions, 13 Mar 2019; 10.3410/f.734885428.793557347
  7. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Marini L et al., J Appl Ecol 2019 56(4):923-928]. In Faculty Opinions, 21 May 2019; 10.3410/f.735747193.793560056
  8. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Purahong W et al., Conserv Biol 2019 33(3):716-724]. In Faculty Opinions, 02 Oct 2019; 10.3410/f.734281275.793565600
  9. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Weedop KB et al., Anim Conserv 2019 22(6):527-536]. In Faculty Opinions, 24 Jan 2020; 10.3410/f.736045750.793570116
  10. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Smith AL et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2020 117(8):4218-4227]. In Faculty Opinions, 04 May 2020; 10.3410/f.737338164.793573898
  11. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Lindsay WR et al., Biol Conserv 2020 249:108710]. In Faculty Opinions, 17 Nov 2020; 10.3410/f.738972313.793579927
  12. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Sitters H and Di Stefano J, Conserv Biol 2020 34(3):550-560]. In Faculty Opinions, 14 Dec 2020; 10.3410/f.736999403.793580767
  13. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Sykes L et al., Conserv Biol 2020 34(3):688-696]. In Faculty Opinions, 13 Jan 2021; 10.3410/f.736630342.793581602
  14. Templeton A: Faculty Opinions Recommendation of [Bernardo HL et al., Conserv Biol 2020 34(4):1029-1034]. In Faculty Opinions, 20 Apr 2021; 10.3410/f.736985340.793584415

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

  1. Templeton, A.R.  Chapter 29, “Population and Evolutionary Biology”,and Chapter 30, “Community Biology and Ecosystems,” in: Biology Today, Third Edition, by D.L. Kirk, pp. 882-941.   Random House, N.Y., 1980.
  2. Templeton, A.R. and L.V. Giddings.  Letter on “Macroevolution.”  Sci. 211: 770-771, 1981.
  3. Templeton, A.R.  An evolutionist’s view of creation science.  Subject to Change, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 10-16, 1982.
  4. Templeton, A.R.  Evolution vs. creationism.  Discovery, Vol. 11, No. 3, pg. 6, 1982.
  5. Templeton, A.R.  Allometry in human evolution.  Boxed insert in Biology, by  P.H. Raven and G.B. Johnson, pp. 480-481.  Times Mirror/Mosby College Publishing, St. Louis, 1986.
  6. Lefkovitch, L.P., F. Oberwinkler, C. Patterson, P.F. Stevens, A.R. Templeton, and A. Saura.  International Evaluation of Systematics.  60 pp.  Swedish Natural Science Research Council, 1990.
  7. Coauthor as Member, UNESCO-MAB/IUBS/SCOPE Workshop on a Research Agenda for Biodiversity (O.T. Solbrig, ed.).  From Genes to Ecosystems:  A Research Agenda for Biodiversity.  124 pp.  International Union of Biological Sciences, Paris, 1991.
  8. Nigh, T.A., W.L. Pflieger, P.L. Redfearn, Jr., W.A. Schroeder, A.R. Templeton, and F.R. Thompson, III (alphabetical order).  The Biodiversity of Missouri, 53 pp.  Missouri Department of Conservation, Jefferson City, Missouri, 1992.
  9. Templeton, A.R.  Coadaptation, local adaptation, and outbreeding depression.  Essay in Principles of Conservation Biology, by G.K. Meffe and C.R. Carroll, pp. 152-153.  Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, MA, 1994.
  10. Zechner, R., H. H. Hobbs, A. Chakravarti, K. M. Weiss, J. H. Edwards, C. R. Scriver, and A. R. Templeton. Genetic factors that contribute to interindividual variations in plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels – Discussion. Pp. 206-210 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  11. Weiss, K. M., C. F. Sing, W. F. Bodmer, N. B. Freimer, A. Chakravarti, R. Chakraborty, A. R. Templeton, and P. S. Harper. Genetic architecture of common multifactorial diseases – Discussion. Pp. 229-232 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  12. Weiss, K. M., J. H. Edwards, A. R. Templeton, C. F. Sing, G. M. Lathrop, W. F. Bodmer, and R. Chakraborty. Symposium on variation in the human genome, held at the Ciba Foundation, London 13-15 June 1995 – Final discussion. Pp. 312-314 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  13. Weiss, K. M., J. Bertranpetit, W. Bodmer, C. R. Scriver, D. L. Hartl, P. Beighton, J. Armour, A. Chakravarti, A. R. Templeton, P. Donnelly, K. K. Kidd, N. B. Freimer, and J. H. Edwards. Genetic and geographical variability in cystic fibrosis: Evolutionary considerations – Discussion. Pp. 114-118 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome1996.
  14. Hartl, D. L., G. M. Lathrop, W. F. Bodmer, R. H. Ward, C. F. Sing, P. S. Harper, A. R. Templeton, A. Clark, and A. Chakravarti. Quantitative phenotype analysis for localization and identification of disease-related genes in a complex genetic background – Discussion. Pp. 293-299 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  15. Clark, A., A. R. Templeton, W. F. Bodmer, J. H. Edwards, A. Chakravarti, K. K. Kidd, and K. M. Weiss. Cladistic approaches to identifying determinants of variability in multifactorial phenotypes and the evolutionary significance of variation in the human genome – Discussion. Pp. 277-283 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  16. Chakravarti, A., W. F. Bodmer, C. F. Sing, K. M. Weiss, A. Balmain, A. R. Templeton, and J. Armour. Population genetics of tumours – Discussion. Pp. 189-193 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  17. Bowcock, A. M., R. H. Ward, K. M. Weiss, A. R. Templeton, W. Bodmer, J. Bertranpetit, R. Chakraborty, A. Chakravarti, and K. K. Kidd. Phylogeographic variability in traditional societies – Discussion. Pp. 19-24 in D. Chadwick, and G. Cardew, eds. Variation in the Human Genome, 1996.
  18. Schull, W. J., G. J. Annas, N. Arnheim, J. Blangero, A. Chakravarti, V. R. Dominguez, G. Dunston, W. H. Goodenough, R. R. Hudson, E. Juengst, M. M. Kaback, D. R. Masys, K. Moseley, R. Sokal, A. R. Templeton, L. Tsui and G. C. Williams. Evaluating Human Genetic Diversity. Washington, D.C., National Academy Press, 1997.
  19. Templeton, A. R.“Species” entry in The Norton Dictionary of Modern Thought, 3rd Edition.  A. Bullock and S. Trombley, eds., Norton Press, 1999.
  20. Templeton, A. R.“Evolution” entry in the World Book Encyclopedia, 2002.
  21. Templeton, A. R.Jenin and the Commitment to Torah.  St. Louis Jewish Light Vol 55, No. 20, pg. 6, May 15, 2002.
  22. Templeton, A.R. Coronary Heart Disease. Encyclopedia of Evolution, Volume 1: 210-212. M. Pagel (ed.) Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002.
  23. Templeton, A. R.Opinion:  Against recent replacement.  Boxed insert in Human Evolutionary Genetics, by M.A. Jobling, M.E. Hurles, and C. Tyler-Smith.  Pg. 261.  Garland Publishing, New York, 2004.
  24. Templeton, A. R.Get facts straight on embryo issues.  Letter to the Editor, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Feb. 14, 2005.
  25. Templeton, A. R. Coadaptation, local adaptation, and outbreeding depression.Essay in Principles of Conservation Biology, 3rd Edition, by M. J. Groom, G.K. Meffe, C.R. Carroll and Contributors, pp. 385-386.  Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, MA, 2006.
  26. Templeton, Alan R.Gene Flow, Haplotype Patterns and Modern Human Origins. In: ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFE SCIENCES. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd: Chichester http://www.els.net/ [10.1002/9780470015902.a0020795], 2007.
  27. Templeton, A. R. Symbiosis. Pp. 1065. World Book Encyclopedia. World Book, Inc., Chicago, 2008.
  28. Templeton, A. R. Hampton Lawrence Carson: 1914-2004: A Biographical Memoir. 19 pgs. Biographical Memoirs National Academy of Sciences. National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.  Document 76721, 2011.  http://www.nasonline.org/site/DocServer/Carson_Hampton.pdf?docID=76721
  29. Templeton, A. R. Revolutionizing the “Out of Africa” story. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News 7:40-41, 45, 2013. http://www.genengnews.com/gen-articles/revolutionizing-the-out-of-africa-story/4804/
  30. Templeton, A. R. and more than 100 other population geneticists and evolutionary biologists.Letter on “A Troublesome Inheritance”, New York Times Sunday Book Review, August 10, 2014. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/10/books/review/letters-a-troublesome-inheritance.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C%7B%221%22%3A%22RI%3A5%22%7D&_r=2
  31. Templeton, A. R. In light of race. Fulbright Israel Magazine: 22-25, Summer, 2019. http://online.fliphtml5.com/jlsk/eanf/#p=22
  32. Templeton, A. R. Obituary, Leon Blaustein (3 June 1953 – 24 June 2020). Amphibia-Reptilia 41:425-428, 2020.
Seminars and Symposia

INVITED SEMINARS

1973
State University of New York at Stony Brook.
University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Purdue University.
University of Illinois, Urbana.
University of Texas at Austin.

1974
University of Hawaii.
University of Texas at Austin.

1975
University of California at Davis.

1976
Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.
Universidade Estadual Paulista de São Jose do Rio Preto.
Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo.
Universidade Estadual Paulista de Araraquara.
University of Texas at Houston.
Baylor University.
University of Iowa.

1977
Washington University.
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

1978
St. Louis University.
Stanford University.

1979
University of Illinois, Urbana.
University of California at Riverside.
University of Kansas, Lawrence.
University of Missouri, St. Louis.

1980
University of Rochester.
University of Iowa.
Ohio State University.
University of Texas at Austin.
Stanford University.

1981
St. Louis University.
Duke University.
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Rice University.
University of Texas at Houston.
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

1982
University of Maryland.
State University of New York at Stony Brook.
University of Utah.
Yale University.
University of Illinois, Urbana.
Washington University.

1983
Cornell University.
Syracuse University.
University of Arizona.
Washington University.

1984
University of Pennsylvania.
Honolulu Zoo.
University of Hawaii (separate seminars to the Departments of Entomology, Genetics, and
Zoology and the Population Genetics Laboratory).
Washington State University.
University of California at Berkeley.
University of North Carolina.
Washington University.

1985
University of Michigan.
Kalamazoo College.

1986
Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan.
University of Michigan (Human Genetics).
University of Michigan (Biological Sciences).
Wayne State University, Detroit.
Michigan State University, East Lansing.
Texas A&M University, College Station.

1987
Syracuse University, New York.

1988
University of Washington, Seattle.
University of Texas, Austin.
Texas A&M University, College Station.
LaTrobe University, Bundoora, Australia.
CSIRO, Canberra, Australia.
University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.
University of Adelaide, Australia.
University of Sydney, Australia.
Washington University, St. Louis.
St. Louis University, St. Louis.
Yale University, New Haven.

1989
Yale University, New Haven.
University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras.
University of Missouri, Columbia.
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

1990
Boston University, Boston.
University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras.
University of Windsor, Ontario.
New Mexico State University, Las Cruces.
Washington University, St. Louis.
Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield.

1991
AAZPA Conservation Academy, St. Louis
Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
Universidade Estadual Paulista de Riberão Preto
Universidade de Campinas
University of Vermont, Burlington.

1992
University of South Carolina, Columbia
AAZPA Conservation Academy, St. Louis
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Michigan State University, East Lansing
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
University of Oxford, England
University College of London, England
University of Edinburgh, Scotland
Gulbenkian Institute of Science, Oeiras, Portugal
University of Basel, Switzerland

1993
University of Aarhus, Denmark
University of São Paulo, Brazil

1994
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis
Washington University, Biology, St. Louis
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Rice University, Houston, TX
Texas A&M University, College Station
University of Connecticut, Storrs
University of Delaware, Newark
Washington University, Anthropology, St. Louis
University of Arkansas
Cornell University, Ithacca, NY

1995
Johan Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Germany
Kansas State University, Manhattan
Johns Hopkins University

1996
Princeton University
San Francisco State University
St. Louis University

1997
University of North Dakota

1998
Texas A&M University
University of Illinois
University of Missouri, Columbia
Fontbonne College, St. Louis
Field Museum of Natural History, Dept. of Anthropology, Chicago
Washington University, Biology, St. Louis

1999
Washington University, Biostatistics, St. Louis
Washington University, Genetics, St. Louis
University of Washington, Department of Molecular Biotechnology
University of Washington, Department of Microbiology
Universidade de São Paulo, Riberão Preto, Brazil
Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
University of the North, Pietersburg, South Africa
University of Venda, South Africa
University of Pretoria, South Africa
Webster University, St. Louis

2000
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
The Technion Institute, Haifa, Israel
University of Haifa, Israel
Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA
University of Haifa, Israel
Weizman Institute, Israel
Washington University School of Medicine
University of Michigan School of Medicine

2001
Universidade do Porto, Portugal (3 seminars)
University of Michigan Museum of Natural History
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
San Diego State University
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
University of California, Davis
Rappaport Institute at the Technion Institute, Haifa, Israel (2 seminars)
Variagenics, Inc., Cambridge, MA
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

2002
University of Haifa, Institute of Evolution, Israel
The Technion Institute, Haifa
The Rappaport Institute, Haifa
University of Haifa, Department of Anthropology, Israel
Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel
Washington University (Dept. of Mathematics)

2003
The Technion Institute, Haifa
The Academy of Science, St. Louis
The University of Guelph, Canada

2004
Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa
Washington University, St. Louis

2005
University of Texas, Austin
Pharmacogenetics Research Network Retreat, Innsbrook, MO
Notre Dame University, South Bend, IN
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Instituto de Ecología, Xalapa, México
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO

2006
University of Tel Aviv, Israel
University of Haifa, Institute of Evolution, Israel
University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, IL
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Wohl Clinic, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

2007
University of Haifa, Israel (2 seminars)
Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel
Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
Institute for Advanced Studies, Jerusalem, Israel
Tel Aviv University
Ben Gurion University, Sdeh Boker, Israel
Washington University, St. Louis, MO

2008
Institute of Evolution, Haifa, Israel
Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP, Brazil
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO  Math/Biology Program
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO  Department of Biology
Illinois State University, Normal, IL

2009
University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, TX
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO
Washington University, St. Louis, MO
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

2010
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO

2011
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO

2012
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

2013
Washington University, St. Louis, MO

2014
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Ben Gurion University, Sede Boker, Israel
Technion, Haifa, Israel

2015
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL
Truman State University, Kirksville, MO

2016
Ben Gurion University, Israel

2017
Volcani Center, Israel
University of Haifa, Israel

2018
School of Medicine of Bar-Ilan University at Zvat, Israel

2019
Department of Computer Science, University of Missouri at St. Louis, MO

2020
Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa

2021 Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington

INVITED SYMPOSIUM AND KEYNOTE SPEAKER

1973. An informational analysis of patet in Javanese gamelan music. Symposium on New Methods in Musicology, Annual Meeting of the Society of Ethnomusicology.  Urbana, Illinois.

1975. Bad luck and good decisions in evolution. Symposium on Probability and Decision Theory.  London, Ontario.

1976. Evolution vs. optimization in ecological genetics. Symposium on Ecological Parameters of Population Genetics, at the Annual Meeting of the Genetics Society of America.  Salt Lake City, Utah.

1977. Genetic revolutions and control of insect populations. Symposium on Biological Control and Evolutionary Processes. Waco, Texas.

1978. Genetics of colonization and establishment of exotic species. Symposium on Genetics in Relation to Insect Management. Bellagio, Italy.

Some possible relationships between rapid speciation, small effective size and breeding systems.  Symposium on The Dynamics of Speciation in Plants and Animals.  Tokyo, Japan.

1979. A new theory for speciation via the founder effect. Symposium on Population Genetics. The Annual Drosophila Meeting.  Bloomington, Indiana.

A new theoretical approach to life history strategies in plants.  Symposium on The Demographic Approach to Plant Population Genetics.  Meeting of the Genetics Societies of America and Canada.  Edmonton, Alberta.

The complexity of interspecific interactions.  Symposium on Interspecific Interactions.  Midwest Conference on Population Biology.  Urbana, Illinois.

1980. Seed pools as an adaptation to randomly varying environments. The Institute of Mathematical Statistics and Biometrics Society Satellite Conference. Davis, California.

The prophecies of parthenogenesis.  Keynote address at Symposium on Variation in Life Histories:  Genetics and Evolutionary Processes.  Iowa City, Iowa.

A genetic complex affecting aging and juvenile hormone in Drosophila mercatorum.  Fund for Integrative Biomedical Research Conference on Juvenile Hormone and Retinoic Acid:  Their Possible Role in Aging.  Washington, D.C.

1981. Mechanisms of speciation: a population genetic perspective. International Symposium on Mechanisms of Speciation.  Rome, Italy.

Some rarely-told tales of Sickle-cell, and other adaptive stories.   Symposium on Perspectives on Evolution , Joint Meeting of the Society for the Study of Evolution and The American Society of Naturalists.  Iowa City, Iowa.

1982. Life history evolution under pleiotropy and K-selection in a natural population of Drosophila mercatorum. International Symposium on Ecological Genetics and Evolution: The Cactus-Yeast-Drosophila Model System.  Oracle, Arizona.

Use of recombinant DNA technology in population genetics.  NIGMS Council Symposium on New Views of Genetic Adaptation.  Bethesda, Maryland.

A molecular view of the evolution of man.  Darwin Centenary Lecture Series.  Salt Lake City, Utah.

The elimination of inbreeding depression in a captive herd of Speke’s gazelle.  Man and the Biosphere Symposium on Applications of Genetics to the Management of Wild Plant and Animal Populations.  Washington, D.C.

Life history evolution under pleiotropy and K-selection.  International Symposium on Theoretical Population Biology.  Edmonton, Alberta.

The origin of species.  Origins Symposium Series.  University of Illinois, Urbana.

1983. The evolution of man: from molecules to morphology. Evolution ’83 (a joint meeting of the Genetics Society of America, The American Society of Naturalists, The Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Stadler Symposium), St. Louis, Missouri.

1984. The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila mercatorum. 25th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, Chicago, Illinois.

Inbreeding vs. Outbreeding Depressions in Captive Populations.  Conference on Genetic Management of Captive Populations, Front Royal, Virginia.

Inferences on natural population structure from genetic studies on captive mammalian populations.  Symposium on Mammalian Dispersal Patterns, American Society of Zoologists, Denver, Colorado.

1985. Genetic systems and evolutionary rates. Symposium on Rates of Evolution, Canberra, Australia.

The relation between speciation mechanisms and macroevolutionary patterns. International Workshop Conference on Evolutionary Processes and Theory,  Israel.

Relation of humans to African apes:  a  statistical appraisal of diverse types of data.   International Workshop Conference on Evolutionary Processes and Theory,  Israel.

Coadaptation and outbreeding depression.  Second Conference on Conservation Biology,  Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Founder effects and the evolution of reproductive isolation.  International Symposium on Genetics, Speciation and the Founder Principle in Honor of Hampton L. Carson, Honolulu, Hawaii.

1986. The molecular through ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila. 50th Anniversary Symposium of the Bureau of Biological Research at Rutgers, A Molecular View of Evolution. Piscataway, New Jersey.

The measured genotype approach of integrating molecular and ecological genetics.  European Population Biology Conference, Woudschoten, The Netherlands.

The evolution of parthenogenesis in Drosophila.  Symposium on Parthenogenesis in Plants and Animals.  Finse, Norway.

The proximate and ultimate control of aging in humans and Drosophila.  Symposium on Aging Processes in Animals.  Brookhaven National Laboratories, Upton, New York.

1987. The role of genetics in conservation biology. American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums Conference. St. Louis, Missouri.

The meaning of species and speciation — a genetic perspective.  Symposium on Speciation and Adaptation.  The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.

1988. The measured genotype approach to quantitative and ecological genetics. Opening talk, Genetics Society of Australia Annual Meeting, Bundoora, Australia.

Natural selection and rDNA in Drosophila.  Symposium on Molecular Biology of Natural Selection,   XVI International Congress of Genetics,  Toronto, Canada.

The genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation.  35th Annual Systematics Symposium on Conserving Biological Diversity:  Prospects for the 21st Century.  Missouri Botanical Garden.

1989. The ecological genetics of abnormal abdomen in Drosophila mercatorum. U.S./Australia Symposium on Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics of Drosophila.  Armidale, Australia.

Offsite breeding of animals and implications for plant conservation strategies.  Center for Plant Conservation Symposium on The Genetics and Population Biology of Rare Plants:  Implications for Conservation and Management.  Missouri Botanical Garden.

Habitat fragmentation:  genetic problems and solutions.  58th Annual Meeting of the Genetics Society of America.  Symposium on Genetics of Conservation.  Atlanta, Georgia.

Genetics and Conservation Biology.  Symposium on Conservation: a population biological approach.  Mainz, Federal Republic of  Germany.

1990. Genetics and Conservation Biology. Millercomm90 Symposium Series on Biodiversity. University of Illinois, Urbana.

Conservation Forensics.  American Genetic Association Symposium.  San Diego, California.

1991. Genetic Basis of Coronary Artery Disease in Humans. Diebold Symposium. Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Genetics and Conservation Biology.  Pew Symposium on Ecology and Molecular Biology.  Princeton, New Jersey.

Genetics and Conservation Policy:  The Ivory Trade and the Endangered Species Act.  World Ecology Day Symposium, International Center for Tropical Ecology, St. Louis.

1992. The Cohesion Species Concept. Can Founding Events Induce Speciation? Implementing the Cohesion Concept:  Implications for Conservation Biology.  Symposium on Speciation and its Consequences.  Lund, Sweden.

The Practical Implementation of the Cohesion Species Concept.  Symposium on Phylogenetic Analysis and Population Biology.  V International Symposium of the International Organization of Plant Biosytematists, St. Louis, Missouri.

Implications of Coalescent Theory for Intraspecific Phylogeny Reconstruction (with Keith Crandall).  Symposium on Coalescent Theory and its Applications to Population Genetics and Phylogenetics.  Society for the Study of Evolution Annual Meeting, Berkeley, California.

Gene Tree Overlay Algorithms:  A Powerful Methodology for Studying Evolution.  Symposium on Evolution as a Computational Process.  Monterey, California.

Translocation as a Conservation Tool.  USDA Forest Service Symposium on Biodiversity in Managed Landscapes.  Sacramento, California.

Concepts of Species;  and The Candidate Locus Approach to Quantitative Genetics.  Gulbenkian Institute Symposium on Basic Analytical Tools in Population Genetics and Evolution, Oeiras, Portugal.

1993. Missouri Biodiversity:Processes and Patterns.  Symposium on Biodiversity Through Integrated Resource Management.  Missouri Forest, Fish and Wildlife Conference, Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri.

A cladistic approach to quantitative genetic analysis.  Gordon Research Conference on Quantitative Genetics.  Ventura, California.

Inbreeding:  One Word, Several Meanings, Much Confusion.  Symposium on Conservation Genetics.  Sandbjerg, Denmark.

Separating Population Structure from Population History.  Symposium on Molecular Evolution and Systematics,  Genetics Society of Canada, Quebec City.

Theories of Speciation, a set of five, three-hour lectures for the “Andre Dreyfus Memorial Lectures on Evolution.”  University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Habitat Restoration in the Ozarks.  Symposium on Conservation and Education, Association of Zoological Horticulture Annual Meeting, St. Louis, Missouri.

Mitochondrial Eve:  what does mitochondrial DNA really tell us about recent human evolution?  Sigma Xi Lecture Series, St. Louis, Missouri.

1994. Functional Properties of Biodiversity:Genetics and Population Structure.  SCOPE/UNEP Biodiversity Synthesis Conference, Asilomar, California.

What are Gene Trees and What Good Are They?  A set of three lectures for the “Russell Marker Lectures in Evolutionary Biology.”  Pennsylvania State University.

All About Eve:  the Genetic Origins of Modern Humans.  Winthrope Rockefeller Distinguished Lecture, University of Arkansas.

Using the Evolutionary History of Small DNA Regions to Understand our Past and Our Present.  National Association of Biology Teachers Convention, St. Louis, Missouri.

1995. The Genetics of Restoration:Reintroducing Collared Lizards on Restored Glade Habitats in the Ozarks.  Federal Environmental Research Conference, Lubast, Germany.

Cladistic Approaches to Identifying Determinants of Variability in Multifactorial Phenotypes and the Evolutionary Significance of Variation in the Human Genome.  CIBA Foundation Symposium No. 197, Variation in the Human Genome.  London.

Cladistic Approaches to Identifying Determinants of Variability in Multifactorial Phenotypes.  Welcome Centre for Medical Science Symposium on Variation in the Human Genome.  London.

Genetic Diversity of Common Human Diseases.  Brazilian Society of Genetics Symposium on Diversidade Genética:  Teoria, Prática e Ética.  Caxambu, Brazil.

Abnormal Abdomen:  A Developmental Syndrome on the Edge of Chaos.  Keynote address at the symposium on Evolution of Development:  Molecules, Mechanisms, Phylogenetics.  Bodega Bay, California.

The Use of Gene Trees in Studying Genotype/Phenotype Associations.  Symposium on Molecular Evolution at the Annual Meeting of the Amer. Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Soc. of Amer., and Soil Sci. Soc. of Amer., St. Louis.

1996. Species and Speciation:Geography, Population Structure, Ecology, and Gene Trees.  Symposium on Speciation: Endless Forms.  Asilomar, California.

Genetic Architecture:  Getting to the Heart of the Matter.  Presidential Address at the 50th Anniversary of the Founding of the Society for the Study of Evolution, St. Louis.

On the Origins of Species.  Plenary Lecture, Fifth International Congress of Systematic and Evolutionary Biology, Budapest.

Microgeographical and ecological differentiation in tychoparthenogenetic capacity in Drosophila mercatorum.  Symposium on Geographical Parthenogenesis:  A Model System in Evolutionary Ecology.  Fifth International Congress of Systematic and Evolutionary Biology, Budapest.

The Evolution of Anatomically Modern Humans:  What Do Gene Trees Really Tell Us?  Symposium on The Phylogeny of Life and The Accomplishments of Phylogenetic Biology.  Tucson, Arizona.

Recent Human Evolution:  The Other Side of the Story.  Keynote Address, 30th Annual Isozyme Conference. Grenada.

1997. Nested cladistic analysis of candidate genes for phenotypic variation.Gordon Conference on Quantitative Genetics and Biotechnology.  Ventura, California.

A critique in the use of genetic data in analyzing human origins.  Symposium on Interpreting Patterns of Human Genetic Diversity.  22nd Annual Meeting of the Human Biology Association.  St. Louis, Missouri.

The complexity of the genotype-phenotype reationship and the limitations of using genetic markers at the inidividual level.  International Workshop on Eugenic Thought and Practice:  A Reappraisal Towards the End of the Twentieth Century.  Van Leer Institute.  Jerusalem, Israel.

Use of genetic data in analyzing human origins:  the implications for racial groups.  Fourth International Samuel L. Kountz Symposium.  Washington, D.C.

Smokey the Bear versus Collared Lizards:  Landscape management in the Ozarks.  George C. Wheeler Distinquished Lecturer.  University of North Dakota, Grand Forks.

Linkage disequilibrium in candidate gene regions.  NIGMS Symposium on Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits.  Bethesda, Maryland.

1998. Linkage mapping versus the candidate gene approach.Symposium on Candidate Genes.  6th World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production.  Armidale, Australia.

Landscape management:  The collared lizard vs. Smokey the Bear.  Conservation Forum.  St. Louis, Missouri.

Using gene trees to separate population structure from population history, and  Using gene trees to define species under the cohesion species concept, and  Biodiversity and Evolution.  IV Eugene Warming Lectures in Evolutionary Ecology.  Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

1999. Gene trees:a powerful tool for exploring the evolutionary biology of species and speciation.  Symposium on Plant Population Biology and Evolution:  New Perspectives toward a New Century.  Kyoto, Japan.

Human race in the context of recent human evolution.  Wenner-Gren Symposium on Anthropology in the Age of Genetics, Teresopolis, Brazil.

Coronary Artery Disease: Applying Evolutionary Principles to a Complex Human Disease.  Zoological Society of Southern Africa, Pietersburg, South Africa.

Using Gene Trees to Identify Species Through Testable Null Hypotheses.  Zoological Society of Southern Africa, Pietersburg, South Africa.

The role of evolution in understanding biological causation.  Symposium on Complexity Research & Biotechnology in Agriculture and Medicine, Bozeman, Montana.

2000. Disrupting Evolutionary Processes.National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on The Future of Evolution.  Irvine, California.

Using phylogeographic analyses of gene trees to test species status.  Symposium on Phylogeography, Hybridization and Speciation.  Aussois, France.

Human Races:  Do They Exist?  Brode Lecture, Walla Walla, Washington.

The Evolution of Anatomically Modern Humans.  Israel Pollak Distinguished Lecture.  Haifa, Israel.

The Evolution of HIV-1 Within Infected Subjects:  Positive Selection in Context.   Israel Pollak Distinguished Lecture.  Haifa, Israel.

The Impact of Fire Management on Habitat Fragmentation of Collared Lizards in the Ozarks.  Symposium on Landscape Effects of Animal Populations, 27th Natural Areas Conference, St. Louis.

The Biological Meaning of Race in Humans.  American Anthropological Association Presidential Symposium on Race falling, Racism rising.   99th AAA meeting, San Francisco.

Genotype to Phenotype:  Disease Genes.  Symposium on Biochemical Systems Theory and Modeling in the Post-Genomic Era:  Principles of Design to Designed Benefits.  Ann Arbor, Michigan.

2001. Out-of-Africa or In-and-out-of Africa:What Genes Tell us About Recent Human Evolution.  Stigler Lectureship, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville.

Out-of-Africa again and again:  insights into human evolution over the last two million years from multiple genes. International Workshop on Genome Organization, Diversity and Evolution.  Haifa, Israel.

Tree Scanning:  A New Method For Detecting Genotype/Phenotype Associations From DNA Sequence Data.  International Workshop on Genome Organization, Diversity and Evolution.  Haifa, Israel.

Going beyond the genome:  lessons from genetic studies on coronary artery disease.  Danforth Symposium, St. Louis,  Missouri.

The impact of fire management on genetic isolation in collared lizards in the Ozarks.  2001 Savanna Review Symposium, Van Buren, Missouri.

2002. Do Races Exist in Humans?What Modern Genetics Tells Us.  Holocaust Remembrance Day Symposium, Rappaport Institute, Haifa, Israel.

Using Haplotype Trees for Phylogeographic and Species Inference in Fish Populations.  Keynote address, Wakefield Symposium, Juneau, Alaska.

Haplotype networks:  new uses for an old technique.  Society of Systematic Biology Symposium on Visualizing complex phylogenetic patterns.  Urbana, Illinois.

Out of Africa Again and Again:  What Genes Tell Us About Recent Human Evolution.  4th

Annual David Murdock-Dole Lectureship.  Nobelforum, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pleiotropy and epistasis as faciliators of the evolution of complex adaptations.   Opening presentation at Symposium on Biotechnology and Complexity in Agriculture and Medicine.  Mountain Sky, Montana.

When does life begin?  An evolutionary genetic answer to a central ethical question.  Symposium on “The embryo from conception to birth:  Scientific discovery, medical and ethical dilemmas”  Tel Aviv, Israel.

2003, Evolution at a human candidate locus for artherosclerosis.Sympoisum on “Challenges in Genetics in the 21st Century.”  Israel Society for Genetics, Tel Aviv, Israel.

2004. Genomics and clinical practice.Thai Physicians of America Association 45th Annual Scientific Congress.  Bangkok, Thailand.

21st Century Genomics and Coronary Artery Disease.”  Keynote Address at Medax 2004, Tel Aviv, Israel

The Evolution of Modern Humans:  What Genes Really Tell Us.  St. Louis Academy of Sciences Public Science Seminar Series.

The Evolution of Modern Humans:  What Genes Really Tell Us.  Genetics Society of Australia, Melbourne.

Simpson’s Paradox in Complex Systems.  Symposium on “Evidence based, opinion based and real world agriculture and medicine.  Mountain Sky, Montana

2005. The Evolution of Humans Over The Last Two Million Years: Genes, Fossils, and Archaeology.  Lorene Murrow Kelly Distinguished Lecturer, Austin, Texas

Landscape Genetics On Different Scales of Space and Time:  lessons from naked mole rats.  XVII International Botanical Congress, Vienna, Austria

Human Evolution Over the Last Two Million Years.  Symposium on “Updating Human Evolution:  Bringing Anthropological and Public Conceptions into Contemporary Perspective.”   Amer. Anthrop. Assoc. Annual Meeting, Washington DC.

2006. Founder Speciation:Mayr’s Misunderstood Legacy to Speciation Theory.  Symposium on “Speciation:  The Enduring Legacy of Ernst Mayr.”   AAAS Annual Meeting, St. Louis.

The Genetics of Complex Diseases.  NIGMS Symposium on Complex Biological Systems, Friday Harbor, Washington.

God of the Gaps versus Life is a Miracle:  Two Perspectives on Evolution and Religion.  Oxford Round Table on Science and Faith, Oxford, UK.

Evolutionary Biology, Development, and Complex Diseases.  Symposium on “Genes, Environments and Human Development, Health and Disease.  Irvine, California.

Human Evolution over the last two million years:  genes, fossils and archaelogy. Genetics Colloquium, University of Wisconsin, Madison

2007. Founder-induced Speciation.Symposium on “New Horizons in Evolutionary Biology.”  Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Israel.

The Evolution of Man:  Genetics, Fossils and Archaeology.  Darwin Day 2007 Lecture, Oslo, Norway

Integrating Landscape Genetics With Phylogeography:  Lessons from Naked Mole Rats.  Keynote Address, The Annual Meeting of the Swiss Zoological, Botanical and Mycological Societies, Zürich, Switzerland

Has Human Evolution Stopped?  Clinical Implications of a Negative Answer.  Grand Rounds Lecture, Rambam Hospital, Haifa, Israel.

Human Evolution Over the Last Two Million Years: Genes, Fossils and Archaeology.  The Fulbright Distinguished Chair Lecture.  Rappaport Institute, Haifa, Israel.

A Population And Evolutionary Perspective On Movement Ecology.  First International Conference on Movement Ecology.  Institute for Advanced Studies, Jerusalem, Israel.

The Impact of Fire on Collared Lizards in the Ozarks.  Keynote Address, Israel Society for Ecology and Environmental Quality Sciences Annual Meeting, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel.

Human Evolution Over the Last Two Million Years: Genes, Fossils and Archaeology.  First Biological Evolution Workshop.  Porto Alegre, Brazil.

2008. Human Evolution Over the Last Two Million Years: Genes, Fossils and Archaeology.Pesquisa FAPESP Symposium Series on the “Genomic Revolution.”  São Paulo, Brazil.

Evolution and Coronary Artery Disease. Pesquisa FAPESP Symposium Series on the “Genomic Revolution.”  São Paulo, Brazil.

Human Evolution Over the Last Two Million Years: Genes, Fossils and Archaeology.  Keynote Address to the 54thAnnual Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Genetics (Congresso Brasileiro de Genética), Salavador, Brazil.

Statistical Testing of Phylogeographic Hypotheses.  Symposium on “Statistical Phylogeography.” 54th Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Genetics (Congresso Brasileiro de Genética), Salavador, Brazil.

The Linguistics of Race.  Public Symposium Talk at the SciFest08 International Science Festival, St. Louis, Missouri.

2009. On the Origin of Species:A 21st Century Perspective on Species and Speciation.  Darwin Anniversary Symposium, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, Missouri.

Using Evolutionary Principles to Identify Genes Associated with Common Diseases in Humans, and Evolutionary Biology and Conservation Biology:  Using Evolutionary Principles to Save Endangered Species.  International Workshop on Darwinism and Functional Biology, Other Sciences and the Humanities.  Be’er Sheva and Jerusalem, Israel.

The impact of prescribed forest fires on the dispersal behavior of collared lizards.  Keynote Address,  Merav Ziv Symposium on  Animal Behavior and Conservation Biology.  Sde Boqer, Israel.

The Nature of Inference in Statistical Phylogeography.  Inaugural lecture in the series “Frontiers of Ecology and Evolution”, Institute of Ecology, Mexico City, Mexico

On the Origin of Species:  Species in the 21st Century.  Public lecture series for “Darwin’s Year”, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City.

On the Origin of Species:  Species in the 21st Century.  Keynote talk.  Symposium on “Evolution and Cytogenetics”, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil.

2010. Smokey the Bear Versus the Collared Lizard:The Role of Prescribed Fires in Restoring Glade Communities in the Ozarks.  Public Talk sponsored by The Nature Conservancy, St. Louis, Missouri.

Evolution and Medicine.  Public Lecture sponsored by the St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri.

God of the Gaps versus Life is a Miracle:  A Jewish Perspective on the Evolution/Creationism Debate.  Public Lecture sponsored by Shaare Zedek Synagogue, St. Louis, Missouri.

Temporal changes in population genetic dynamics in response to habitat fragmentation and restoration by prescribed woodland fires in the eastern collared lizard.  Symposium on “Conservation Genetics” at the 37thNatural Areas Conference, Osage Beach, Missouri.  Organizer and moderator of symposium.

2011. Phylogenetic approaches to species identification.Symposium on “Evolution and Population Genetics” at the 6thIlanit/FISEB meeting, Eilat, Israel.

Do Biological Races Exist in Humans?  Symposium on “Is There Space for Race in Evolutionary Biology?”  2011 Spring Conference for the Bay Area Biosystematists, San Francisco, California.

Panel Discussant.  The Genetics of Migrant and Isolate Populations.  Second Sheba Conference, Hertzliya, Israel.

Tikkun Olam:  Research on Human Diseases and Endangered Species in Israel.  Beyond Brookings Symposium on Research Connections Between Washington University and Israel.  St. Louis, Missouri.

2012. The evolutionary connection between senescence and child growth and development.Symposium on “Evo-Devo of Child Growth”.  Rappaport Institute, Medical School of the Technion, Haifa, Israel.

How many species of elephants are there in Africa, and what is a species anyway?  Keynote address to the Intregrative Biology Retreat of Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida.

Conservation biology:  from preservation to restoration.  First International Symposium on Evolutionary Biology, João Pessoa, Brazil.

2013. Restoration of collared lizards from genetics through demography through landscape management in the Missouri Ozarks.Current River Conservation Opportunity Areas Meeting.  Twin Pines Nature Center, Winona, Missouri.

The significance of interactions at multiple levels in biology.  Alan Templeton Symposium.  Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.

2015. Do Biological Races Exist in Humans.Plenary Lecture, Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference.  Bloomington, Indiana.

Hypothesis compatibility versus hypothesis testing of models of human evolution.  32 Altenberg Workshop in Theoretical Biology.  Konrad Lorenz Institute, Klosterneuberg, Austria.

Genomic diversity in present day humans: evolutionary aspects.  Keynote Address, European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology Annual Meeting.  Barcelona, Spain.

2016. Darwin and population thinking:Are we there yet in studies of human evolution?  Darwin Day Symposium on “Human Evolution:  Milestones Along an Unpaved Road.”  University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.

Genetics, Genomics and Halacha.  Science Shabbaton, Beit Avraham Synagogue, St. Louis, Missouri

2017. Fire, Lizards, and Grasshoppers:The Ozark Connection.  The Nature Conservancy Doug Ladd Science Symposium. Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri

2018. The New Eugenics.Science Shabbaton, Beit Avraham Synagogue, St. Louis, Missouri

2019. Do Races Exist in Humans?Keynote Speaker, Darwin Day Lecture, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

Using Networks to Gain New Insights into Old Problems in Evolutionary Genetics. International Symposium on “New Horizons in Evolution”.  University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.

2020. The impact of internal habitat structure on the conservation and population structure of collared lizards. Keynote Address, Annual Meeting of the Zoological Society of Israel, Haifa, Israel.

Graduate Trainees

1. Joan Strassmann
Predoctoral Student
1974-1979
B.S. Zoology, University of Michigan, 1974
Thesis:  Kin Selection and the Population Biology of the Social Paper Wasp, Polistes exclamens
Current Position: Charles Rebstock Professor of Biology, Washington University

2. Dale Lewis
Predoctoral Student
1975-1980
B.S. Zoology, University of Michigan, 1975
Thesis:  Population Biology of a Communal Bird Species, Plocepasser mahali
Current Position:  Programme Officer, Wildlife Conservation Society in Zambia

3. Scott Williams
Predoctoral Student
1976-1981
B.A., Biology  University of Chicago, 1976
Thesis: Implications of life history changes for genetic polymorphisms
Current Position: Professor of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

4. Rob DeSalle
Predoctoral Student
1979-1984
B.A., Biology  University of Chicago, 1978
Thesis: Mitochondrial DNA evolution and phylogeny in the planitibia subgroup of Hawaiian Drosophila.
Current Position:  Curator of Entomology, American Museum of Natural History

5. Teresa Crease
Predoctoral Student
1981-1986
B.S.,  Biology, University of Windsor, Canada, 1980
Thesis: Mitochondrial DNA Variation In Populations of Daphnia pulex Leydig Reproducing By Obligate and Cyclic Parthenogenesis
Current Position:  Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

6. Scott Davis
Predoctoral Student
1982-1986
B.A., Biology  Baylor College, Waco, TX, 1981
Thesis: Population Structure and Patterns of Speciation in Geomys  (Rodentia: Geomyidae):  An Analysis Using Mitochondrial and Ribosomal DNA
Current Position:  Executive Director, Turtle Survival Alliance, 1989 Colonial Parkway, Fort Worth, TX 76110

7. Christopher Phillips
Predoctoral Student
1984-1989
B.S., Environmental Biology/Zoology  Eastern Illinois University, 1983
Thesis: Breeding Pond Fidelity, Population Structure and Phylogeography in the Spotted Salamander, Ambystoma maculatum
Current Position:  Curator of Amphibians and Reptiles, Illinois Natural History Survey

8. Linda Park
Predoctoral Student
1984-1989
B.S., Biology/Genetics Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1983
Thesis: Evolution in the Repleta Group of Drosophila:  A Phylogenetic Analysis Using Mitochondrial DNA
Current Position: Program Manager of the Genetics and Evolution Program, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA

9. Eric Routman
Predoctoral Student
1985-1990
B.S., Biology  Indiana University of Pennsylvannia, 1982
M.S., Biology  University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 1984
Thesis: Paedomorphosis and Population Structure in the Salamanders Cryptobranchus
alleganiensis and Ambystoma tigrinum
Current Position:  Professor of Biology, San Francisco State University

10. Hope Hollocher
Predoctoral Student
1986-1991
B.A., Biology  University of Pennsylvannia, Philadelphia, 1983
Thesis:  The Evolutionary Dynamics of the Y Chromosome With Respect to the abnormal
abdomen Syndrome in a Natural Population of Drosophila mercatorum  Near Kamuela, Hawaii
Current Position: Clare Boothe Luce Professor, Notre Dame University

11. Susan Lawler
Predoctoral Student
1986-1992
B.A., Biology/Religious Study  Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, 1985
Thesis:  Ecological Genetics of the bobbed Syndrome in Drosophila hydei
Current Position:  Head of Department/Senior Lecturer of Environmental Management and Ecology, La Trobe University, Wodonga, VIC,  Australia

12. Kerry Shaw
Predoctoral Student
1987-1993
B.A., Biology  Princeton University, 1986
Thesis:  The Evolution of Song Groups in the Hawaiian Cricket Genus Laupala
Current Position:  Professor, Department of Neurobiology & Behavior, Cornell University

13. Keith Crandall
Predoctoral Student
1989-1993
B.A., Biology/Mathematics  Kalamazoo College, 1987
M.A., Statistics Washington University
Thesis:  Molecular Systematics and Evolutionary Biology in the Crayfish Subgenus
Procericambarus (Decapoda: Camabaridae)
Current Position:  Founding Director, Computational Biology Institute, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

14. Anne Gerber
Predoctoral Student
1989-1994
B.A., Art History, Smith College, Northhampton, MA. 1985
Thesis: The Semiotics of Subdivision:  An Empirical Study of the Population Structure of
Trimerotropis saxatilis (Acrididae)
Current Position:  Senior Property Manager, Sterling Acceptance Co., and Self-employed Entrepreneur and Paper Investor, Atlanta, Georgia

15. Marshal Hedin
Predoctoral Student
1990-1995
B.A., Zoology   Humboldt State University, Arcata, California, 1987
M.S., Genetics  Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 1989
Thesis:  Speciation and Morphological Evolution in Cave Spiders (Araneae: Nesticidae: Nesticus) of the Southern Appalachians
Current Position:  Professor of Biology, San Diego State University

16. Paul Wilson
Predoctoral Student
1990-1996
B.A., Biology   Lafayette College, Easton, PA, 1989
Thesis:  Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Biogeography Among Some Etheostomid Darters of the Central Highlands
Current Position:  Associate Professor of Biology, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

17. Delbert Hutchison
Predoctoral Student
1991-1997
B.A., Zoology   Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 1990
Thesis:  Population Genetic Consequences of the Holocene Invasion of the Ozarks and Flint
Hills by the Eastern Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus collaris collaris) with Subsequent Habitat Fragmentation
Current Position:  Associate Professor and Environmental Studies Co-Director, Biology Department, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA

18. Laura Langton (Bischof)
Predoctoral Student
1991-1998
B.S., Biology   Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR,  1988
M.S., Biology    Portland State University, Portland, OR, 1990
Thesis:  Molecular Systematics and Horn Evolution in the Antilopinae (Mammalia:  Bovidae)
Current Position: Research Development Manager, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

19. Reinaldo Alves de Brito
Predoctoral Student
1994-1999
B.S., Biology  Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1990
M.S., Genetics   Univeridade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 1993
Thesis:  Separating Historical from Ecological Forces Shaping the Evolution of the Cactophilic Fruit Flies Drosophila serido and D. buzzatii
Current Position:  Professor, Universidade Federal de Sào Carlos, Sào Carlos, SP, Brazil

20. Anton Weisstein
Predoctoral Student
1995-1999
B.A., Chemistry, Mathematics    Washington University, St. Louis, 1993
Thesis: Patterns of HIV-1 evolution in individuals with differing rates of CD4 T cell decline
Current Position:  Professor, Truman State University, Kirksville, Missouri

21. Keri Shingleton (Williamson)
Predoctoral Student
1993-2001
B.A., Biology, Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa, 1992
Thesis:  Population structure and evolutionary history of a cave-adapted planthopper in the Hawaiian Islands
Current Position:  Head of Biology, Holland Hall, Tulsa, Oklahoma

22. Melissa Kramer
Predoctoral Student
1997-2001
B.S., Biology, The Pennsylvannia State University, University Park, Pennsylvannia, 1995
Thesis: Microevolutionary forces affecting the incidence of parthenogenesis in Drosophila mercatorum
Current Position: Research Scientist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

23. Jennifer Brisson
Predoctoral Student
1998-2004
B.A., Biology, Kansas State University, 1997
Thesis: Evolution and Developmental of Abdominal Pigmentation in the cardini group of Drosophila
Current Position:  Associate Professor, Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York

24. Jared Strasburg
Predoctoral Student
1998-2004
B.S., Life Sciences, University of Missouri at Rolla, 1997
Thesis: Comparative Phylogeography and Conservation Genetics in Two Lizard Species
Current Position:  Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth

25. Jon Hess
Predoctoral Student
2000-2004
B.S., Biology,  Denison University; Granville, OH, 1998
Thesis:  A Population Genetic Study of the Eusocial Naked Mole-Rat Heterocephalus glaber.
Current Position:  Conservation Geneticist, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. Portland, Oregon

26. Rosemarie Koch
Predoctoral Student
2000-2004
M.S., Physiological Ecology of Animals, University of Tuebingen, Germany, 1999
Thesis:  Hormonal control of dispersal behavior in naked mole rats
Current Position:  Author and producer of wildlife and nature documentaries.  Nona-Naturedocx, Berlin, Germany

27. Taylor Maxwell
Predoctoral Student
2001-2006
B.A., Biology.  Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, 2000
Title of Research Project: Applications of evolutionary theory to genotype/phenotype association studies
Current Position:  Computational Biologist, Computational Biology Institute, George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

28. Corey Anderson
Predoctoral Student
2001-2006
B.A., Integrative Biology, University of California at Berkeley, 1997
Title of Research Project:  Landscape genetics and landscape ecology of a local timber Rattlesnake population
Current Position:  Associate Professor of Biology, Valdosta State University, Georgia

29. Sharlee Climer
Predoctoral Student (co-advisor with Weixong Zhang, Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering)
2005-2006
M.S., Computer Science, University of Missouri, St. Louis, 2001.
Title of Research Project:  Novel search strategies that exploit bounds with applications in engineering and biology
Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Missouri at St. Louis

30. Michele Johnson
Predoctoral Student
2005-2007
B.A., Biology, Wake Forest University, 2001
Title of Research Project:  Behavioral Ecology of Caribbean Anolis Lizards:  A Comparative Approach
Current Position:  Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas

31. Jennifer Neuwald
Predoctoral Student
2002-2008
M.S., Biology.  San Diego State University, California, 2002
Title of Research Project: Temporal changes in population genetic dynamics of the Eastern Collared Lizard, Crotaphytus collaris collaris, in response to forest fire management.
Current Positions:  Assistant Professor, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; Assistant Director of the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado

32. Nicholas W. Griffin
Predoctoral Student
2004-2010
B.A., Biology.  Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA 2002
Title of Research Project: Inbreeding depression and competition in the square-stemmed monkeyflower (Mimulus ringens)
Current Position:  Assistant Professor of Research, Washington University School of Medicine

33. Amy Conley
Predoctoral Student
2008-2013
B.A. Biology.  Rice University, Houston, Texas.  2005.
Title of Research Project:  The genetic impact of translocations in collared lizard populations in the Missouri Ozarks
Current Position:  Spatial Ecologist, New York Natural Heritage Program, Albany, New York

34. Carlo Lapid
Master’s Student
2008-2013
M.S. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology.  University of the Philippines, Diliman. 2007.
Title of Research Project:  Integrating structural and physicochemical context into improved codon substitution models for the detection of positive selection

35. Gili Greenbaum
Predoctoral Student (shared with Dr. Shirli Bar-David at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
2013-2017
B.Sc., Mathematics and Philosophy.  The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, ISRAEL 2008
Title of Research Project:  Modeling the dynamics of changes in genetic diversity of small populations due to genetic drift and their ecological and evolutionary implications
Current Position:  Postdoctoral Fellow, Stanford University.

36. Simona Showstack
Master’s Student (shared with Dr. Leon Blaustein at the University of Haifa)
2015-2017
B.Sc., Biology.  Ben-Gurion University, Be’er Sheva, ISRAEL.  2015.
Title of Research Project:  Influence of various biotic and abiotic factors on predation and coloration of Salamandrainfraimmaculata larvae

37. Antonina Polevikove
Master’s Student (shared with Dr. Leon Blaustein at the University of Haifa)
2013-2017
B.Sc., Biology.  University of Haifa, ISRAEL.  2013.
Title of Research Project:  Local adaptation, phenotypic plasticity and gene expression of Salamandra infraimmaculatalarvae in permanent vs. ephemeral breeding habitats
Current Position:  Doctoral student, Tel Aviv University
&nbsp

Postdoctoral Trainees

1. L. Val Giddings
1980-1984
B.S.,  Zoology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Ph.D., Genetics, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HA, 1980
Research in lab:  Parthenogenesis in Drosophila mercatorum:  Evolution of pre-mating isolation asymmetries
Current Position:  Vice President, The Biotechnology Industry Organization

2. John C. Patton
1984-1988
Ph.D.,  Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 1978
Research in lab:  Population genetics of Peromyscus species
Current Position:  Research Scientist, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University

3. Chris Simon
1984-1985
Ph.D., SUNY, Stony Brook, NY, 1982
Research in lab:  Evolution of Periodic Cicadas
Current Position:  Professor, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

4. Sydney A. Cameron
1987-1992
Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence, 1985
Research in Lab:  Genetic structure of hybridizing bumble bees;  molecular phylogeny of bumble bees;  evolution of eusociality in bumble bees
Current Position: Professor of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

5. Christopher Phillips
1989-1991
Ph.D., Population & Evolutionary Biology, Washington University, 1989
Research in lab:  Phylogeography of salamanders and lizards in the Ozarks
Current Position: Curator of Amphibians and Reptiles, Illinois Natural History Survey

6. Nicholas Georgiadis
1991-1995
Ph.D., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Syracuse University, 1991
Research in lab:  Phylogeography of ungulates in Africa
Current Position: Research Scientist, Puget Sound Institute, University of Washington

7. Stan Braude
1993-1997
Ph.D.,  Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1991
Research in lab:  Genetic population structure of naked mole rats
Current Position:  Teaching Professor, Department of Biology, Washington University

8. Sergio Matioli
1993-1996
Ph.D., Genetics, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, 1993
Research in lab:  Quantitative trait loci in Drosophila mercatorum
Current Position:  Associate Professor, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

9. David Posada
2001-2003 (shared time when he was a Senior Scientist, Variagenics, Inc., Boston, USA)
Ph.D., Zoology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
Research in lab:  Haplotype and recombination inference in humans
Current Position:  Professor of Genetics, University of Vigo, Spain

10. Xiaofeng Fan
2007
M.D., 1987, Ph.D. 1995, Viral Immunity, Nanjing Medical University, China
Research in lab:  Mechanisms for hepatitis C virus relapse in aniviral therapy
Current Position:  Assoc. Res. Prof, Dept. of Internal Medicine, St. Louis University

11. Lior Blank
(University of Haifa, shared with Dr. Leon Blaustein)
2010 – 2013
Ph.D. Ecology and Environment, Technion, Israel
Research in lab:  Landscape genetics of Salamandra infraimmaculata in Northern Israel
Current Position:  Researcher, Agricultural Research Organization, Department of Plant Pathology and Weed Research, Bet Dagan, Israel

12. Michael Garvin
(University of Haifa, shared with Dr. Leon Blaustein)
2014 – 2016
Ph.D., Fisheries, University of Alaska, Juneau, Alaska
Research in lab:  Transcriptome variation in Salamandra
Current Position:  Staff Research Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

13. Valentina Rovelli
(University of Haifa, shared with Dr. Leon Blaustein)
2016 – 2019
Ph.D., Biology and Systems Analysis, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy
Research in lab:  Transcriptome variation in Salamandra
Current Position:  Research Associate, Tel Aviv University