Welcome to the Lab

The Neuroskeletal Biology Laboratory (NSBL) was founded in 2016 and is part of the Musculoskeletal Research Center (MRC) and Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases at Washington University. The laboratory consists of a mix of technicians, trainees/fellows, and undergraduate researchers. For more information about our members and their accomplishments, please see the people, awards, and antics pages. You can also find us on twitter.

Our Research

Our laboratory synthesizes concepts from cell biology, physiology, and bioengineering to study the relationships between the nervous system and the skeleton. We have a directed interest in understanding how neural signals contribute to skeletal homeostasis, and how perturbations to this system contribute to bone loss, impaired healing, and skeletal pain. For more information about our work, see our projects and publications.

Recent Events

Dr. Scheller elected to the board of ISBM

Dr. Scheller elected to the board of ISBM
Dr. Scheller was elected to serve as a 2020 - 2022 board member for the International Society of Bone Morphometry (ISBM). She will work with the society and board to develop the field of skeletal imaging and morphology, including hosting the 2022 ISBM meeting in Denmark.

Graduate student Alec Beeve awarded BMES travel award

Graduate student Alec Beeve awarded BMES travel award
Mr. Beeve was selected as a recipient of the Department of Bioengineering travel award to attend the BMES conference in San Diego, CA where he will present his work on the acute and chronic regulation of bone by bioelectric stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Congratulations Alec!

Visits to UCLA and UCSF prompt discussions about nerves in bone

Visits to UCLA and UCSF prompt discussions about nerves in bone
Dr. Scheller was hosted by Dr. Tamara Alliston and the to UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery to present the ongoing work in the laboratory pertaining to neural regulation of skeletal pathophysiology as part of the CCMBM seminar series.  She then traveled to the UCLA School of Dentistry to visit with Dr. Paul Krebsbach and to […]

Welcome to Mr. David Mingyu Shin

David Shin is currently a junior and was previously majoring in Economics and Accounting at Washington University in St. Louis prior to following the call to change his major to Biology. We welcome David to the lab and look forward to working with him to develop his scientific skills.

Refreshable Nanobiosensor Based on Organosilica Encapsulation

Refreshable Nanobiosensor Based on Organosilica Encapsulation
Implantable and wearable biosensors that enable monitoring of biophysical and biochemical parameters over long durations are highly attractive for early and presymptomatic diagnosis of pathological conditions and timely clinical intervention. Poor stability of antibodies used as biorecognition elements and the lack of effective methods to refresh the biosensors upon demand without severely compromising the functionality […]

Bone marrow adipose tissue does not express UCP1

Bone marrow adipose tissue does not express UCP1
Adipocytes within the skeleton are collectively termed bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). BMAT contributes to peripheral and local metabolism, however, its capacity for cell-autonomous expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a biomarker of beige and brown adipogenesis, remains unclear. To overcome this, Ucp1-Cre was used to drive diphtheria toxin expression in cells expressing UCP1 (Ucp1Cre+/DTA+). Despite […]

Welcome to Dr. Alexander Ahmadi and Xiao Zhang

Welcome to Dr. Alexander Ahmadi and Xiao Zhang
A warm welcome to two new trainees.  Dr. Alexander Ahmadi joins us from the Saint Louis University (SLU) periodontics residency program.  Dr. Ahmadi will be working with us on the oral biosensor project.  Xiao Zhang is currently visiting as a rotation student from the BME program at Washington University. Xiao will investigate the properties and […]

Shared Autonomic Pathways Connect Bone and Adipose Tissue.

Shared Autonomic Pathways Connect Bone and Adipose Tissue.
Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is increased in both obesity and anorexia. This is unique relative to white adipose tissue (WAT), which is generally more attuned to metabolic demand. It suggests that there may be regulatory pathways that are common to both BMAT and WAT and also those that are specific to BMAT alone. The […]

Jobs and Opportunities

Check out our Jobs and Projects pages for more information.