Welcome to the Lab

The Neuroskeletal Biology Laboratory (NSBL) was founded in 2016 and is part of the Musculoskeletal Research Center (MRC) and Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases at Washington University. The laboratory consists of a mix of technicians, trainees/fellows, and undergraduate researchers. For more information about our members and their accomplishments, please see the people, awards, and antics pages. You can also find us on twitter.

Our Research

Our laboratory synthesizes concepts from cell biology, physiology, and bioengineering to study the relationships between the nervous system and the skeleton. We have a directed interest in understanding how neural signals contribute to skeletal homeostasis, and how perturbations to this system contribute to bone loss, impaired healing, and skeletal pain. For more information about our work, see our projects and publications.

Recent Events

Postdoctoral fellow Dr. Natalie Wee presents at ASBMR

Postdoctoral fellow Dr. Natalie Wee presents at ASBMR
Dr. Wee was selected for a podium presentation for her work entitled "Shared autonomic pathways connect bone marrow and peripheral adipose tissues across the central neuraxis". She presented during the session on 'Bone-Lipid Connections' at the recent 2019 ASBMR meeting. This work was also recently accepted for publication in Frontiers in Endocrinology. Congratulations Natalie!

Congratulations and farewell to Dr. Craft

Congratulations and farewell to Dr. Craft
Dr. Craft has worked with us since the founding of the lab in 2016 and her contributions have helped to shape the lab into what it is today. We are thankful for her science and her leadership during the past few years. We wish her all the best as she transitions into her new career!

Dr. Scheller closes out the BMA2019 meeting

Dr. Scheller closes out the BMA2019 meeting
Dr. Scheller presented on neural regulation of marrow fat and its connections across the central neuraxis as the final talk of the 5th International Meeting on Bone Marrow Adiposity in Odense, Denmark.

Peripheral Neuropathy as a Component of Diabetic Skeletal Disease

Peripheral Neuropathy as a Component of Diabetic Skeletal Disease
The goal of this review is to explore clinical associations between peripheral neuropathy and diabetic bone disease and to discuss how nerve dysfunction may contribute to dysregulation of bone metabolism, reduced bone quality, and fracture risk. In addition, we address therapeutic and experimental considerations to guide patient care and future research evaluating the emerging relationship […]

Madelyn Lorenz and Alec Beeve present at ISAN 2019

Madelyn Lorenz and Alec Beeve present at ISAN 2019
Members of the lab recently attended the 11th Congress of the International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience to share their science with other SPARC investigators and the autonomic neuroscience community. The lab presented two posters including "Nerves of the Bone: Foundational Neuroanatomical Mapping of Skeletal Nerves from Bone to Brain" (Lorenz) and "Acute and chronic responses […]

Alec Beeve appointed to the Skeletal Disorders Training Program

Alec Beeve appointed to the Skeletal Disorders Training Program
In addition to successfully passing his qualifying examination, Alec Beeve was recently appointed to a competitive graduate student fellowship position on the Skeletal Disorders Training Program (T32). Congratulations to Alec on his exam and his research fellowship to study the effects of acute and chronic bioelectric nerve stimulation on skeletal health.

Exploiting Self-Capacitances for Wireless Power Transfer.

Exploiting Self-Capacitances for Wireless Power Transfer.
Conventional approaches for wireless power transfer rely on the mutual coupling (near-field or far-field) between the transmitter and receiver transducers. In this paper, we show that when the operational power-budget requirements are in the order of microwatts, a self-capacitance (SC)-based power delivery has significant advantages in terms of the power transfer-efficiency, receiver form-factor, and system […]

Characterization of the bone marrow adipocyte niche with 3D-EM.

Characterization of the bone marrow adipocyte niche with 3D-EM.
The bone marrow adipocyte (BMA) exists in a microenvironment containing unique populations of hematopoietic and skeletal cells. To study this microenvironment at the sub-cellular level, we performed a three-dimensional analysis of the ultrastructure of the BMA niche with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

Jobs and Opportunities

Check out our Jobs and Projects pages for more information.