Meteorites that do not look much like meteorites

I have perused the Meteorite Picture of the Day website to find photos that show the exterior of real stony meteorites but that the meteorites, as pictured, violate many of the recognition principles that I emphasize on this website.

Gold BasinL4 ordinary chondrite (Arizona, USA)
  Only a small patch of fusion crust remains.

Bjurböle (1) Bjurböle (2)L/LL4 chondrite (Finland)
  No fusion crust.

KnyahinyaL/LL5 chondrite (Ukraine)
  Fusion crust is not obvious but sawn face shows metal grains.

WellmanH ordinary chondrite (Texas, USA)
  Fusion crust is not self-evidently a meteorite fusion crust in the photo.

Dalgety DownsL4 chondrite (Australia)
  Heavily weathered exterior.

Tulia (b)L6 ordinarychondrite (Texas, USA)
  Heavily weathered exterior.

ThuatheH4/5 ordinary chondrite (Lesotho)
  Observed fall (45 kg) with fusion crust, but the surface is not smooth.

Tatahouine (1) Tataouine (2)diogenite (Tunisia)
  An observed fall (12 kg), but the fusion crust is not self-evidently a meteorite fusion crust. The surface is rough. Like Thuathe above, the meteoroid likely broke into several pieces low in Earth’s atmosphere where the velocity was too low to create enough heat to cause substantial melting.

Erg Chech 002ungrouped achondrite (Algeria, desert)
  This a good example of a meteorite from Northwest Africa that has lost its fusion crust completely, probably by wind erosion.

Loulan Yizhi 034Ureilite (China, desert)
  Little or no fusion crust. Also, fusion crusts on achondrites are not as dark as those on chondrites.

BaqiangziEnstatite chondrite (China, desert)
  Atypical fusion crust.

Clarendon (c)L4 ordinary chondrite (Texas, USA)
  Another weathered meteorite missing some fusion crust but regmaglypts remain.

Golden Gate MountainH4 ordinary chondrite (Arizona, USA)
  This heavily weathered stone would have been easy to overlook.