Why did we bring Hostile Terrain to St. Louis?

St. Louis may be far away from the border, yet the repercussions of crises ranging from migrant death to family separation have reached our region, our organizing work, our faith communities, our research projects, and our classrooms. Within our many roles, we hope that the exhibit will help us remember those dying each day as they cross the border. Beyond solemn remembrance, we hope the exhibit will allow us to engage in conversations about the global and local significance of borders and border crossings.

What is community? Where does it extend? Who does it include?

Map showing the various locations where participants have filled out toe tags for our St. Louis version of Hostile Terrain 94.

This map shows the various locations where participants have filled out toe tags for our St. Louis version of Hostile Terrain 94. These individuals range from students studying remotely, alumni, friends and family members of St. Louis residents, and supporters of St. Louis community organizations. The nebulous boundary that we see on this map, winding its way around the country, depicts how our St. Louis community extends beyond the political borders of the city and county. We hope that just as our St. Louis community has stretched to encompass people in dispersed places, our global community will stretch to be more inclusive and humane towards the migrants who search for better lives at the U.S. borders that are manifested physically and mentally around the world. We dare to imagine a global community whose boundaries extend far beyond the borders that divide our various countries. 

 

HT94@WUSTL is sponsored by the International and Area Studies Program, the American Cultural Studies Program, the Department of Art History and Archeology, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement and Institutional Diversity.