NIH uses the information submitted in the Other Support document to assess the capacity of the individual to carry out the research as proposed, and to review any potential overlap/duplication with the proposed project. NIH requires information on all current and pending support for ongoing projects and proposals.

Other Support” is sometimes referred to as “current and pending support” or “active and pending support.”

NIH requires disclosure of all financial and non-financial resources to which a faculty member may have direct or indirect access, including but not limited to research-related grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements (regardless of the legal recipient), as well as non-WU appointments/positions and in-kind resources provided by non-WU entities that are not freely available to other researchers (e.g., laboratory equipment, research materials, lab personnel, etc.).

Quick Resources

NIH Other Support Webpage, incl. instructions, examples and most up-to-date NIH templates.

WU Other Support Template with Examples

NIH Guidance: “Protecting US Biomedical Intellectual Innovation”, including table and examples of what to disclose on which documents, i.e. Other Support, Bio, RPPR, etc.

NIH FAQ on Other Support and Foreign Components

Other Tips:

Who must submit Other Support? And When?

NIH requests Other Support information for: ­

  • All individuals designated in an application as senior/key personnel devoting measurable effort on the project, except
    • program directors, training faculty, and other individuals involved in the oversight of training grants.
    • individuals categorized as Other Significant Contributors.
  • All senior/key personnel, excluding consultants, in progress reports when there has been a change in active other support, except
    • program directors, training faculty, and other individuals involved in the oversight of training grants.
  • Other Support is typically requested at the Just-in-Time (JIT) stage as well at the time of the RPPR. Check individual RFAs for other procedures related to proposal submission.

What sort of information should be included in Other Support?

Information collected on the Other Support Form includes:

Project number
Contact Principal Investigator
Source of support
Title of project/subproject
Dates of approved/proposed project
Total award amount for the entire award period covered (including facilities and administrative costs)
Person months per year
Indication of whether the listed award overlaps with proposed project

Considerations
  1. “Other Support” aims to capture the resources to which you have access. This is not limited to grants and contracts but includes the many and varied resources in support of your research. Example sources of funding include:
    1. funds from all foreign and domestic entities; including:
      • federal contracts, non-federal research grants, cooperative agreements, institutional awards, foreign talent program support, in-kind support, etc.
      • a non-U.S. resource that supports the research of an investigator and/or researcher, but does not meet the definition of a foreign component because the work is being performed in the U.S.
    2. financial support for laboratory personnel;
    3. provision of high-value items that are not freely available (e.g. biologics, chemical, model systems, technology, data, etc.)
  2. “In-kind support” must also be included in the Other Support document. In-kind support includes resources without a specific monetary value.
    1. Examples: equipment, supplies, lab resources and visitors to your lab supported by a another entity. (See also #1.)
  3. Other Support includes resources that are related to your research as well as those directly supporting your research.
  4. Resources available to you from sources outside of WU must also be included in Other Support. These may include domestic or foreign institutions or colleagues outside WU.
  5. Other Support does not include: NIH Training awards, prizes, gifts, start-up funds from your home institution (but start-up from outside organizations must be reported).
  6. If in doubt, err on the side of disclosure.

What is a foreign component?

Foreign Component is existence of any “significant scientific element or segment of a project” outside of the United States, in other words:

  • performance of work by a researcher or recipient in a foreign location, whether or not NIH grant funds are expended and/or
  • performance of work by a researcher in a foreign location employed or paid for by a foreign organization, whether or not NIH grant funds are expended.

For NIH, when a segment of the research is performed outside of the U.S., the following activities would constitute a foreign collaboration that must be disclosed as a foreign component:

  • Research involving human subjects or animals;
  • Extensive travel for the purpose of data collection, surveying, sampling, and similar activities (excluding foreign travel for consulting);
  • Collaborations with investigators anticipated to result in co-authorship;
  • Use of facilities or instrumentation;
  • Receipt of financial support or resources from a foreign entity;
  • Any activity of the recipient that may have an impact on U.S. foreign policy through involvement in the affairs or environment of a foreign country.

Example A: a PD/PI of an NIH-funded grant has a collaborator outside of the U.S. who performs experiments in support of the PD/PI’s NIH-funded project, this would constitute a foreign component, regardless of whether the foreign collaborator receives funding from the PD/PI’s grant.

For more about what constitutes a foreign component, see the NIH Grants Policy Statement and NIH NOT-OD-19-114.

Lab personnel who are trapped outside the U.S. due to COVID-19 but are working on your research remotely, whether or not paid by the project, may qualify as a foreign component and needs prior approval.

NIH has determined that postdocs who are required to work on their originally approved work remotely from a foreign country due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, where no grant funds are going to a foreign entity, does not represent the performance of a significant scientific element or segment of the project outside the US, as outlined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement definition of a foreign component. (NIH FAQs on COVID-19).

References: NIH Grants Policy Statement,and  NIH NOT-OD-19-114. See also NIH FAQs on COVID-19.

Does a Foreign Component need to be reported on Other Support?

The Foreign component should be part of the proposal, R&R Other Project Information Form, not the Other Support document. The addition of a foreign component to an ongoing NIH grant requires NIH prior approval, as outlined in the NIH Grants Policy Statement, Section 8.1.2 , Prior Approval Requirements.  Work with your department administrator to submit the prior approval request.

If an activity does not meet the definition of foreign component because all research is being conducted within the United States, but the activity includes a non-U.S. resource that supports the research of an investigator and/or researcher, it must be reported as other support.

Example A-2: a PD/PI of an NIH-funded grant has a collaborator outside of the U.S. who performs experiments in support of the PD/PI’s NIH-funded project, this would constitute a foreign component, regardless of whether the foreign collaborator receives funding from the PD/PI’s grant. Additional funding from a foreign source for the NIH-supported research of a PD/PI at a U.S. institution would NOT constitute a foreign component but would necessitate reporting as other support.

References: UCSF Office of Sponsored Research, the NIH Grants Policy Statement, NIH FAQs on COVID-19.